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8 new horror movies on Max, Paramount Plus, Shudder and more in April 2024

 David Dastmalchian laughs maniacally in front of a hypnotic background in Late Night with the Devil.
David Dastmalchian laughs maniacally in front of a hypnotic background in Late Night with the Devil.

Considering how long January lasted, how can it be April already? Who knows. Witchcraft? Devilry? Probably the latter if we take into account the new horror movies to stream this month, which boast two occult-centric titles, 2009's The House of the Devil and this year's must-see Late Night With the Devil.

Of course, if the satanic panic vibe isn't for you there's plenty of other horrors hitting streamers. Paramount Plus drops the creepy as hell Talk To Me, Shudder's catalog includes a '90s thriller and a new French arachnid affair, and Max gets The Strangers just in time for the prequel to hit movie theaters. All in all, a little of something for everyone's tastes – devils, creatures, and a nasty home invasion pic. Go on, scare yourself!

Talk To Me (2023)

When: April 1st
Where to stream it:  Paramount Plus (US), Netflix (AU, UK)

Arguably last year's most talked-about horror, Talk To Me hails from Australian filmmaking siblings Danny and Michael Phillipou. The duo's first feature-length movie revolves around a mysterious hand artifact imbued with a supernatural ability. When a person holds the hand and utters the titular words, they're suddenly flooded with a spirit that takes control of their body. Naturally this incredibly dangerous item falls into the hands of teenagers, in particular, Mia (Sophie Wilde) who is grieving the death of her mother. What the film nails perfectly is the carefree frivolity surrounding the hand; the teens use it like a party piece, something to spice up a dull night. Things spiral out of control in a dazzling display of special effects and wild plotting. Do not miss.

The Strangers (2008)

When: April 1st
Where to stream it: Max (US), Amazon Video (AU, UK)

A knock at the door in the middle of the night. It’s a scenario you might entertain as a reason to install a Ring camera… then shun immediately as it’s too horrible to face. Bryan Bertino leans into this prospect, making a terrible night even worse for couple Kristen (Liv Tyler) and James (Scott Speedman) who are on the cusp of a break up when a trio of masked strangers arrive at their home. What unravels over the next 80 minutes is a jolt to the home invasion sub genre, as the couple are gaslit, taunted and stalked. By far its most terrifying moment stems from a single line of dialogue uttered by one of their pursuers; but we'll leave that unspoiled. Make sure to check this off your list before the first in a new trilogy of Strangers movies hit theaters next month.

Mute Witness (1995)

When: April 1st
Where to stream it: Shudder (AU, UK, US)

A real gem sadly banished to an old DVD release with zero streaming options for years finally hits Shudder. Arriving shortly before the wave of 90s teen horror, this outing from An American Werewolf in Paris helmer Anthony Waller revolves around the shooting of a low-budget slasher in Moscow. One night, mute special effects artist Billy (Marina Zudina) stumbles across two men filming a snuff movie who make it their mission to find her. Her night doesn’t stop there as she becomes embroiled in a chase across the city. This is tense, nerve-shredding stuff that tosses in plenty of humor to balance the scares. A brilliant ’90s thriller that’s flown under the radar for too long.

Night Swim (2024)

When: April 5th
Where to stream it:  Peacock (US), Amazon Video (AU, UK)

Blumhouse earned its stripes making scary blockbusters for peanuts, and that trend continues in 2024. What makes Night Swim so effective is its simplicity. It might not dazzle with grandiosity but it's a nifty suburban horror that excels on account of its performances. Wyatt Russell stars as Ray Waller, a former baseball star forced into retirement on account of his chronic illness. He and his wife Eve (Kerry Conlon) and their two kids relocate to a new home that boasts an outdoor pool. This is no ordinary pool, however, as the family all encounter strange happenings – including the cat. The story bounces between the reality of Ray’s predicament and the unexpected benefits the pool offers. With a bunch of jump scares and a wacky third act borrowed from The Shining, it’s perfect Friday-night viewing.

Late Night With the Devil (2023)

When: April 19th
Where to stream it: Shudder (AU, UK, US)

What would you get if you crossed The Exorcist with Ghostwatch? Probably this. It was a buzzy hit even before its limited theatrical run thanks to its huge audience response at 2023's genre festivals. Written and directed by Cameron and Colin Cairnes, another antipodean sibling duo, the movie unfurls like a found-footage documentary with a regular television broadcast at its heart. That show is a syndicated talk show called 'Night Owls' and hosted by Jack Delroy (David Dastmalchian) whose recent personal tragedies have affected the show's numbers. Delroy takes it upon himself to spice up their Halloween episode by bringing a possessed girl onto the show in an attempt to boost ratings. Dark, delicious, and a wholly fresh take on the possession tale, Late Night With The Devil might just be the best horror of the year…

Saw X (2023)

When: April 19th
Where to stream it: Starz (US), Amazon Video (AU, UK)

Honestly, Saw X has no right to be this good. As the 10th entry in the torturous franchise, you might expect another by-the-numbers slasher replete with Jigsaw incomprehensibly reappearing from beyond the grave to dispense more of his vigilante justice. Well, the latter part is true, Jigsaw is back, but there's nothing humdrum here. Wedged between the events of Saw and Saw II, this legacy inbetween-quel follows John Kramer as he seeks radical cancer treatment in Mexico but is ultimately scammed. The meat of the movie follows John and long-serving sidekick Amanda (Shawnee Smith is back!) as they bring those responsible to justice. It's bloody, it's tragic, it's got some of the gnarliest traps the franchise has seen. But really this one works so well because it's unbeholden to the tangled web of mythology most other sequels struggled to balance.

The House of the Devil (2009)

When: April 22nd
Where to stream it: Shudder (AU, UK, US)

Ahead of Ti West's trilogy-capper MaxXxine hitting cinemas this year, now's as good a time as any to revisit the indie horror helmer's back catalog. The House of the Devil is a sublime slice of satanic-panic throwback cinema, a slow-burn that captivates even when we follow characters' everyday activities. West's decision to shoot in 16mm to capture that 1970s aesthetic is the reason it's so delightful to watch. Things kick off as college student Samantha (Jocelin Donahue) responds to a babysitting ad and finds herself in a peculiar house taking care of an ailing woman whom she must not disturb. As the title suggests, all is not right, and before long, sudden gratuitous violence bursts from the screen like the Kool-Aid Man. Donahue is a force of nature as Sam, a 'final girl' who isn't talked about nearly enough.

Infested (2023)

When: April 26th
Where to stream it: Shudder (AU, UK, US)

Spiders are making a comeback… into your nightmares, mostly. With Longlegs (alright, so it might not be about them) and Sting on the theatrical horizon, get your small-screen helping of arachnophobia from Infested. This French horror packs in some truly special creature effects and entangles them in genuine human story. The movie follows Kaleb (Théo Christine), on the cusp of turning 30 and struggling with his sister and his best friend, he turns to his love of animals for comfort. Except the venomous spider he brings home turns loose and begins to recreate at an alarming rate, attacking his entire apartment block. Director Sebastian Vanichek is on the rise thanks to the movie's reception at numerous festivals – it won Best Picture and Best Director at its US premiere at Fantastic Fest – and is tapped to write and direct the new Evil Dead spin-off. Just in case the spiders weren't enough incentive.

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