Arsenal change name on Twitter ahead of Invincibles documentary

Arsenal have changed their name on Twitter as they prepare to air a documentary celebrating the club's historic invincible season.

The Gunners were labelled as 'Invincibles' after they went the entire 2003-04 Premier League campaign without losing a match under master coach Arsene Wenger.

With English top-flight football currently suspended until at least April 30 because of the Covid-19 pandemic, Arsenal has decided to show a documentary on the club's website and app to celebrate the Invincibles' achievement.

In the build-up to the screening, Arsenal changed their Twitter name to 'Arsena', with fans wondering why the club had removed the 'L' from their social media account.

A savvy supporter figured out why the Gunners had changed their name, tweeting that it was because 'we didn't take an L' during the invincible season, to which the club replied with a wink emoji.

Arsenal won 26 of their 38 matches during the 2003-04 Premier League campaign, drawing the other 12 games as they won the title by 11 points from Chelsea.

French superstar Thierry Henry lead the team in attack with 30 league goals, while compatriot Robert Pires chipped in with 14.

However, Arsenal didn't make the most of their strong team in other competitions as they failed to lift a trophy in four other competitions.

The club was eliminated at the semi final stage in both the FA and League Cups, while they could only make the quarter-final of the Champions League and were beaten in the Community Shield.

This was the Gunners' most recent league championship, as they have struggled to make an impression on the title race ever since - despite claiming four FA Cups in this time.

Liverpool looked a chance to go the current Premier League season unbeaten, but a 3-0 loss to Watford saw the Reds stopped at 27 games without defeat.

The Reds were also denied the chance to win the most successive games in the English top flight, with the Hornets loss meaning they tied Manchester City's record of 18.