August 9 declared a regular holiday

Kim Arveen Patria
Yahoo! Southeast Asia Newsroom
1 August 2013
FilipinoMuslim women pray during a mass within the Muslim Holy month of Ramadan at a mosque in the restive province of Sulu, southern Philippines, 12 July 2013. Muslims around the world abstain from eating drinking and sexual relations from dusk to dawn during Ramadan the holiest month in the Islamic calendar. EPA/BEN HAJAN
FilipinoMuslim women pray during a mass within the Muslim Holy month of Ramadan at a mosque in the restive province of Sulu, southern Philippines, 12 July 2013. Muslims around the world abstain from eating drinking and sexual relations from dusk to dawn during Ramadan the holiest month in the Islamic calendar. EPA/BEN HAJAN

(UPDATE) The whole nation joins Muslims from all over the world in celebrating the end of the holy month of Ramadhan as Malacanang declared August 9, 2013 a regular holiday.

Proclamation No. 629 series of 2013, signed by President Benigno Aquino III Thursday, named Eid’l Fitr (Feast of Ramadhan) “a regular holiday throughout the country.”

“Eid’l Fitr is celebrated by the Muslim World for three days after the end of the month of fasting,” the document, posted on the Official Gazette, said.

August 9 has been declared a holiday in the predominantly Catholic Philippines to “promote cultural understanding and integration,” the Palace said.

Aside from Eid’l Fitr, there are two other holidays in August this year under Proclamation No. 459 released Sept. 1, 2012.

Ninoy Aquino Day, August 21 (Wednesday), is a special (non-working) holiday. August 26, the last Monday of August, is meanwhile National Heroes Day, a regular holiday.

Under the Labor department’s pay rules, employees not working on regular holidays are still entitled to 100 percent of their regular daily rate.

“Provided that they [were] present, or [were] on leave with pay on the workday immediately preceding the holiday,” the Labor department said.

Employees who work on a regular holiday that also fall on their rest days, meanwhile, will be entitled to 200 percent of the daily rate for the first eight hours and an additional 30 percent for additional hours.

On special non-working days, the following shall apply:

“a. If the day is unworked, the ‘no work, no pay’ principle shall apply unless there is a favorable company policy, practice or collective bargaining agreement (CBA) granting payment on a special day even if the day is unworked.

b. If worked, the employee shall be paid an additional 30 percent of the daily rate of 100 percent on the first eight hours of work. In excess of eight hours, he/she shall be paid an additional 30 percent of the hourly rate on said day.

c. If the day falls on the employee’s rest day and is worked, he/she shall be paid an additional 50 percent of the daily rate of 100 percent on the first eight hours of work. In excess of eight hours, he/she shall be paid an additional 30 percent of the hourly rate.”