Yani Tseng has HSBC Women’s Champions title in her sight

Yani Tseng is eyeing the HSBC Women's Champions title (Getty Images)Yani Tseng is eyeing the HSBC Women's Champions title (Getty Images)

"I can't wait to go."

That stark warning came from top woman golfer Yani Tseng in the press conference of this year's HSBC Women's Championship, which tees off this Thursday at the Tanah Merah Country Club.

Tseng, the Taiwanese world No 1, says she is looking forward to seeing "what I can do on the golf course" at Tanah Merah, as she eyes the US$1.4 million (S$1.8 million) prize money on offer.

And she has certainly prepared herself well for the Singapore challenge.

Before touching down in Changi Airport on Monday, Tseng, 23, bagged the winner's trophy at the Honda LPGA Thailand tournament at the Siam Country Club Old Course at Pattaya.

That dramatic victory was sealed with a tap-in for a birdie on the final hole.

But standing in her way of more glory is a strong field led by the tournament's defending champion Karrie Webb from Australia.

While acknowledging that Tseng - who had 12 tournament wins, including seven on the LPGA tour last year - had an amazing 2011, Webb is adamant she is not about to give up her title without a fight.

Declaring that she loves being a tournament's defending champion, Webb says "having the best memories from the year before" gives her extra inspiration to win again.

But the 37-year-old says the weather will also play a part in determining whether she gets her hands on the championship trophy this time around. "There's rain in the forecast, so it might be a bit of a stop-and-start for us. If the wind gets up there at Tanah Merah, the course becomes quite challenging."

The field includes (from left) Michelle Wie, Suzann Pettersen, Yani Tseng and Karrie Webb (Getty ImagesThe field includes (from left) Michelle Wie, Suzann Pettersen, Yani Tseng and Karrie Webb (Getty Images)

Besides Tseng and Webb, the other A-listers in the 63-strong field includes Sweden's world No 2 Suzann Pettersen, Japan's Ai Miyazato who won the tournament in 2010 and Hawaii-born golf sensation Michelle Wie.

But if Tseng is feeling the pressure from her opponents, she is certainly not showing it. Looking composed, she says she knows what she is capable of achieving on a golf course, but emphasises the importance of staying patient and focused.

And besides, she just loves coming to Singapore. "I have many friends here. And in Singapore, I can speak Mandarin and eat many nice food," she chirps.

For more information on the HSBC Women's Champions 2011, visit www.hsbcgolf.com

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