MusicScene
  • The Dirt Radicals: Matt Cooper, Masashi Kimura, Sam Cooper (Photo courtesy of The Dirt Radicals)The Dirt Radicals: Matt Cooper, Masashi Kimura, Sam Cooper (Photo courtesy of The Dirt Radicals)

    Every first and third Wednesday of the month, Yahoo! MusicScene shines the spotlight on talented, up-and-coming bands or musicians in Singapore. In our final installment in a series of features on Baybeats bands, we speak to The Dirt Radicals.

    The Dirt Radicals believe that Singaporeans should put their money where their mouth is, and support local musicians in action and not just words.

    Speaking to Yahoo Singapore, Sam Cooper, 26, said, "Something that bugs me about the Sinagpore music scene is that people say they support it, but they don't do anything to show it, like buy a CD or go to a show."

    "If you support it then support it; if you don't then don't say so," added the bassist.

    The trio have a wealth of experience playing overseas, in addition to having spent 13 years in Singapore, to compare the support in different markets.

    Drummer Matt added, "The support for local musicians here is probably not so dynamic as the people prefer pop music more."

    The Dirt Radicals are a punk

    Read More »from ‘Actions speak louder than words for music support’
  • In their heyday, My Writes played several times at the Esplanade Outdoor Theatre. (Photo courtesy of My Writes)In their heyday, My Writes played several times at the Esplanade Outdoor Theatre. (Photo courtesy of My Writes)

    Yahoo! MusicScene shines the spotlight on talented, up-and-coming Singaporean bands or musicians. This week, in the second part of our feature on bands playing at BayBeats 2011, we speak to My Writes, who were defunct for some time before their invitation to play at the festival.

    A simple phone call woke them up from hibernation, just when they thought their days of performing were over.

    Singapore band My Writes -- which was formed in 2005 -- was actually at a point where they could not even remember when their last gig was.

    "Actually, if not for Baybeats, the band would still be in hibernation mode. So when we got the invitation, we met and pulled ourselves together and started jamming," the band's guitarist, Shaun, told Yahoo! Singapore.

    The call from the Baybeats organisers could not have come at a better time too.

    Having now sorted out their own lives after National Service for the guys, and settling down with a job, the band -- comprising Dhaniah, 24, Shaun, 25, Muhammad, 27,

    Read More »from S’pore band My Writes wakes up from the dead
  • From left: Shahril, Naz, Razak, Aim (Photo courtesy of Ossuary)From left: Shahril, Naz, Razak, Aim (Photo courtesy of Ossuary)

    Every first and third Wednesday of the month, Yahoo! MusicScene shines the spotlight on talented, up-and-coming Singaporean bands or musicians. This week, in conjunction with BayBeats 2011, we speak to veteran metal heads Ossuary.

    Many local bands would allow age or new trends to dictate what they can or cannot do, but not Ossuary.

    Having been in the local music scene for more than 20 years, the heavy metal band are headlining Baybeats 2011, Singapore's biggest music festival.

    By local standards, the band members — Shahril, 37; Aim, 36; Naz, 38; and Razak, 40 — are considered grand-daddies of Singapore's metal scene, but they do not see themselves as obsolete.

    In an interview with Yahoo! Singapore, Shahril, the only member of the band to have been around since its formation in 1990, said, "The music stays the same, but with the different players (we have had) we have evolved to become better over the years. The roots (in heavy metal) are still there."

    Still actively gigging in their

    Read More »from Heavy metal oldies still going strong
  • Inch Chua is "heartbroken" over what she believes is a lack of support for local musicians in Singapore. (Yahoo! photo/ Ewen Boey)Inch Chua is "heartbroken" over what she believes is a lack of support for local musicians in Singapore. (Yahoo! photo/ Ewen Boey)

    Local musician Inch Chua is "heartbroken" over the lack of support for local music in Singapore, and has made the tough decision to leave her homeland to further her music career.

    The 22-year-old singer-songwriter aired her frustration over the support -- or rather lack of support -- for local music in a note on Facebook earlier this week.

    "I've always been one that's hopeful about things here, and I've been very positive. But after much much thinking and sitting on it for months, I decided it was the best decision to make if I wanted to grow as an artist," the pint-sized artiste told Yahoo! Singapore.

    Chua is still in the midst of firming up the details of moving away, but it is understood that she will be heading to Los Angeles, which, according to her, has a more progressive environment for the arts.

    Regarding her note on the social networking site, the singer of local band Allura said that it was initially private and not suppose to be circulated, but a couple of her musician

    Read More »from Inch Chua slams lack of support for local musicians
  • The troubled life of Amy Winehouse

    A sad look at where she was just one month ago, here's a clip of her performing "Tears Dry On Their Own" from her ill-fated concert in Belgrade.

    By Joseph Brannigan Lynch (Yahoo US music blog, The Amplifier)

    With the news that British R&B star and tabloid target Amy Winehouse has died from as yet undisclosed causes, two things are clear: the music world lost one of its most passionately soulful voices, and this is a tragedy that has surprised no one. Winehouse's struggles with drugs and alcohol were often in the public eye and even addressed in her own music, like her best-known hit "Rehab."

    Throughout her colorful, troubled life, Winehouse fought many demons: addiction, an eating disorder, and a particularly tumultuous love life.

    Her struggles to stay sober

    Although she first broke through to international audiences with a song that found her saying "no, no, no" to her record company's claims that she belonged in rehab, it didn't take long for fans to realize she did have a problem

    Read More »from The troubled life of Amy Winehouse
  • From left: Peter Huang, Eugene Yip, Lee Ein Ein, Juni Go, Calin Wong and Ng Wei Jin (Photo: MICappella)From left: Peter Huang, Eugene Yip, Lee Ein Ein, Juni Go, Calin Wong and Ng Wei Jin (Photo: MICappella)

    Every first and third Wednesday of the month, Yahoo! MusicScene shines the spotlight on talented, up-and-coming Singaporean bands or musicians. This week, we speak to the founders of a cappella rock band, MICappella, about the stereotyping of their music genre.

    When the term "a cappella" is mentioned, a typical image of a jazzy group of singers grooving to "shoo bee doo wop" music may come to mind.

    However, local vocal band MICappella begs to differ.

    "We're very aware of the members' of public's opinions about the phrase 'a cappella', that it is just boring. But, no, there are a lot of other cool stuff out there that can be done with just voices," said band founder Peter Huang.

    Describing their music as a cappella rock, Huang and Calin Wong, who are both freelance musicians, told Yahoo! Singapore that the 6-man band's focus is on contemporary music.

    "As a musician, I'm not very good with any particular instrument, and as a vocalist I think I'm okay," said Huang, who added, however,

    Read More »from S’porean a cappella band seeks to set new beat
  • L-R: Daniel Sassoon, Jordan Cheng, Amanda Ling, Roland Lim (Photo: IEHAC)L-R: Daniel Sassoon, Jordan Cheng, Amanda Ling, Roland Lim (Photo: IEHAC)

    Every first and third Wednesday of the month, Yahoo! MusicScene shines the spotlight on talented, up-and-coming Singaporean bands or musicians. This week, we speak to Daniel Sassoon, frontman of local post-rock band, In Each Hand A Cutlass and former lead guitarist of popular indie pop band Electrico.

    Daniel Sassoon, guitarist for local band In Each Hand a Cutlass (IEHAC), believes creative freedom is more important than commercial fame.

    Those haven't been just empty words for him. In early 2008 he left indie pop band Electrico to form his current -- and far less popular -- group months later.

    "Electrico was always a pop band at heart," he said. "I've always wanted to bring more of an edge to it, to try to make it a bit more cutting edge and different, but the reality was, because of the focus on the commercial and melodic nature of stuff, it wasn't always possible.

    "IEHAC, on the other hand, is something that has a lot more creative depth to it, and it's something I'm certainly a lot

    Read More »from ‘Creative freedom beats commercial fame’
  • Deon Toh, one of the winners of Noise-Singapore's singer-songwriter programme. (Photo/ Deon Toh)Deon Toh, one of the winners of Noise-Singapore's singer-songwriter programme. (Photo/ Deon Toh)

    Every first and third Wednesday of the month, Yahoo! MusicScene shines the spotlight on talented, up-and-coming Singaporean bands or musicians. This week, we focus on young musical talents in Singapore.

    Who says Singapore does not have good young talent?

    Six artistes -- all below 35-years-old -- were chosen  as winners in the recently-concluded Noise-Timbre Singer-Songwriter Programme.

    Under the programme, young aspiring singer-songwriters send in YouTube videos for a chance to gig at Timbre @ The Substation. Those whose entries get the most votes win.

    Chief creative director and co-founder of Timbre Group, Danny Loong, told Yahoo! Singapore, that Timbre Music Academy will be taking baby steps to work on developing the chosen musicians into recognised performers.

    Loong, the ex-bandleader and founder of critically-acclaimed blues band Ublues, lamented that Singaporeans' mindset is to see more bands play, but not solo performers.

    "Customers to Timbre always ask 'which band is playing'

    Read More »from Are solo artistes at a disadvantage in S’pore?
  • Local shoegaze band Stellarium is a rare breed in Singapore. (Photo/ Stellarium)Local shoegaze band Stellarium is a rare breed in Singapore. (Photo/ Stellarium)

    Every first and third Wednesday of the month, Yahoo! MusicScene shines the spotlight on talented, up-and-coming Singaporean bands or musicians. This week, we speak to Az Kadir from local band Stellarium about shoegaze music in Singapore.

    Have you heard about the shoegaze music scene in Singapore?

    Less popular than indie music, shoegaze originated from Britain in the 1980s, and is named after a kind of motionless performing style. Artistes in this genre typically stand on stage and stare at the floor while playing.

    However, this type of music is better-known for its pure, unadulterated sound as marked by loud, droning guitar riffs and bursts of distortion and feedback.

    "You can describe shoegaze music as noise rock or neo-psychedelic rock," said Az Kadir, leader of local shoegaze band Stellarium.

    Listening to their self-titled debut album, which was completely self-recorded, I was blown away by the constant assault of effects-driven guitar tones and booming drum beats.

    It was like a

    Read More »from Does shoegaze music have a place in S’pore?
  • Yahoo! Singapore speaks to the versatile and dynamic local jazz singer, Michelle. (Photo courtesy of Michelle)Yahoo! Singapore speaks to the versatile and dynamic local jazz singer, Michelle. (Photo courtesy of Michelle)

    Every first and third Wednesday of the month, Yahoo! MusicScene shines the spotlight on talented, up-and-coming Singaporean bands or musicians. This week, we catch up with pop singer Michelle, who believes that it is good to remember where her roots lie.

    Singapore singer-pianist Michelle wants to retain her local characteristics while aiming to conquer global markets.

    Already making her mark in Europe, the 35-year-old has performed with Grammy-nominated pianist Kenny Werner at the North Sea Jazz Festival, and was chosen by Michelle Weir (author of Vocal Improvisation) and Grammy-nominated Phil Mattson to demonstrate scat singing at the 2004 International Vocal Festival, Tilburg.

    "There is a struggle to maintain who you are as a person, as a musician," Michelle told Yahoo! Singapore.

    She also prides herself as a musician who does not follow trends and believes that she should stay true to how she wants to grow as a musician.

    "It's very easy to get the record label to help shape me and

    Read More »from S’pore singer remembers her roots

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