SingaporeScene

Artistes launch fund-raising EP for Japan disaster

Local artistes come together in song to raise funds for Japan, which has been devastated by an earthquake and tsunami. (Yahoo! photo/Alicia Wong)Local artistes come together in song to raise funds for Japan, which has been devastated by an earthquake and tsunami. …

To do their part in raising funds for Japan which has been devastated by an earthquake and tsunami, local artistes have come together to release an EP.

The EP, a musical recording that is between a single and a full album, will be launched on Monday 28 March.The titles of the tracks are 'Touch of Gold', 'Don't Be Afraid' and 'Little White Bait'.

The songs are sung by some 40 local Xin Yao artistes, including actor Edmund Chen, singer/songwriter Jiu Jian, the Tang Quartet and musician/writer/researcher Liang Wern Fook.

All proceeds will go the Singapore Red Cross Society (SRC) to support their efforts in providing critical assistance to the Japan disaster, which has seen over 9,000 lives lost.

Japan's government has said the cost of the earthquake and tsunami that devastated the northeast could reach US$309 billion (S$391 billion).

The song 'Touch of Gold' is about a character who continues to persist in a long journey, despite the difficulties along the way, said Jiu Jian, who spearheaded this project.

"It's a song of hope. As long as you put in your heart, things can turn to gold," said Jiu Jian, who wrote the song last month for another project.

"To me, music is the tool for peace and also to comfort people at some critical moments. I always think, what can we do from the local music scene? We're always so slow, not doing anything, that's the (main reason) why I want to do this," said Jiu Jian.

SRC ambassador Edmund Chen hopes the effort will go some way to help rebuild lives in Japan. (Yahoo! photo/Alicia Wong)SRC ambassador Edmund Chen hopes the effort will go some way to help rebuild lives in Japan. (Yahoo! photo/Alicia …

"We definitely hope they will be able to rebuild their home asap (as soon as possible) and start a new life," said actor Edmund Chen, the SRC's first celebrity ambassador. "It's truly a very meaningful project."

He sang a verse with veteran reporter Kwan Seck Mui. "When Jiu Jian called, I was in the midst of doing a project, so I rushed down after my project, that was 9-ish at night and I finished at about 10."

Some 2,500 EPs have been produced and will be sold at all 27 Popular bookstores for $20. They hope to raise at least $50,000.

The project, which was completed in a week, cost about $7,000. The project was sponsored by Toyogo and Ho Kee Pau.

SRC's secretary general Christopher Chua expressed appreciation to the artistes who stepped forward to lend their support.

He said, SRC does not profit from the funds collected. A portion of the funds collected goes to running the disaster relief operation, such as buying donation cans and freight costs.

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