#Nationofkindness courtesy campaign kicks off

The latest campaign aim to foster individual graciousness during daily routines. (Photo: SKM)The latest campaign aim to foster individual graciousness during daily routines. (Photo: SKM)

A nation of kindness starts with one.

That’s the message of Singapore's latest courtesy campaign which kicked off on Monday.

Organised by the Singapore Kindness Movement, the month-long campaign aims to "incorporate graciousness in our daily routines" -- with a particular focus on behaviour on public transport -- through the power of the individual to extend a greeting or helping hand.

The end goal? To foster a kind and gracious society.

SKM’s messages will be visible on public transport and elsewhere on the island, as well as in print and online, to encourage people to take ownership of kindness. Social media users are also encouraged to share kindness stories and photos using #NationofKindness on Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter.

“In working with numerous ground-up movements, I have met many inspiring individuals, many of whom are youths, who give me great hope for Singapore. Their stories deserve to be heard by more people, and will motivate us to do our part to build a more pleasant and liveable home for everyone, " said Dr William Wan, general secretary of SKM.

What do you think -- will the latest movement work?

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