Yaw Shin Leong has vacated his parliament seat: Michael Palmer

Yaw Shin Leong has officially vacated his Parliament seat. (Yahoo! file photo)Yaw Shin Leong has officially vacated his Parliament seat. (Yahoo! file photo)

Former Workers' Party (WP) member Yaw Shin Leong will no longer represent Hougang as a Member of Parliament (MP) and has left his Parliament seat.

This announcement was made in Parliament on Tuesday by Speaker of Parliament Michael Palmer, who told the house that Yaw will not appeal against his expulsion from the Workers' Party, Channel NewsAsia reported.

Yaw had informed the Clerk of Parliament of his decision via email on 20 February, CNA said.

On 14 February, WP announced Yaw's expulsion for failing to account to party leaders allegations related to his private life. Following WP's announcement, Palmer announced during parliamentary sitting on 17 February that Yaw will have to inform the parliament of his appeal in a weeks' time.

Under the Constitution, once an elected MP ceases to be a member of, or is expelled or resigned from the political party for which he stood in an election, the seat shall become vacant.

Related articles:

No requirement to call immediate by-election in Hougang: Hri Kumar Nair
Yaw Shin Leong not appealing WP explusion
'No surprise if WP wins by-election'

  • Britain's Cameron warns of dirty money in London property
    Britain's Cameron warns of dirty money in London property

    British Prime Minister David Cameron is to speak out against "corrupt money from around the world" being laundered through property in Britain in a speech to be made during a trip to Southeast Asia on Tuesday. The Conservative Party leader is to announce a consultation on increasing transparency on property ownership, amid concerns from campaigners that rising property prices in Britain are fuelled by corrupt cash. Cameron is to highlight concerns that British properties, particularly in London, "are being bought by people overseas through anonymous shell companies, some with plundered or laundered cash", according to released excerpts of a speech he is to give in Singapore.

  • Fire Noodle fad led to ‘sold-out situation’ in some Singapore supermarkets
    Fire Noodle fad led to ‘sold-out situation’ in some Singapore supermarkets

    There’s a new food fad in Singapore and it’s spreading like wildfire.

  • Singapore's ruling party contends with new voting majority
    Singapore's ruling party contends with new voting majority

    By Rujun Shen SINGAPORE, July 28 (Reuters) - - When Singapore celebrates its 50th year of independence on Aug. 9 and its older citizens eulogise the country's economic feats, its ruling party founded by the late Lee Kuan Yew faces an unprecedented wave of young voters who may not be as nostalgic.  For the first time, citizens born after the country's independence in 1965 will likely account for the majority of voters in a general election due to take place by January 2017. As of 2014, almost 54 percent of citizens above 20 were born in 1965 and later, compared with 46 percent born after independence in 2010. Singapore's voting age is 21.