‘Call Me Maybe’ parody trolling Chatroulette users goes viral

YouTube star Steve Kardynal films a "Call Me Maybe" parody in sexy bikinis and nighties to troll Chatroulette users. (Screengrab)YouTube star Steve Kardynal films a "Call Me Maybe" parody in sexy bikinis and nighties to troll Chatroulette users. …

It's been done by Cookie Monster, the USA swim team and even the PricewaterhouseCoopers HR team but this parody of "Call Me Maybe", without doubt,  takes the cake.

In the near 4-minute video, YouTube star Steve Kardynal catches people using online chat service Chatroulette completely off-guard by showing up on videocam dressed only in a bikini and prancing along to Carly Rae Jepsen's hit song.

Chatroulette, an online chat website that randomly pairs strangers from all over the world, connects to users' webcam services. Some log on to meet new friends but others, particularly men, log on expecting to have a bit of naughty "fun".

The video, uploaded on 10 August, has racked up an amazing 11 million views in just four days. Kardynal is no stranger to being known of wacky videos like this. To date, he has gathered 585,000 subscribers and 113 million total video views. He is also known for his Songs in Real Life videos and other lip-dub videos.

Find out why below.

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