Chinese behaving badly: man fights with commuters after his child urinates in Shanghai’s subway

A man fights and argues with commuters after his child urinates in Shanghai subway. (Yahoo screengrab of YouTube video)A man fights and argues with commuters after his child urinates in Shanghai subway. (Yahoo screengrab of YouTube …

A video showing a man arguing with commuters after his infant urinated on a train in Shanghai has been going viral on the Internet.

In the six-minute long video, which has a lot of vulgarities, a man in grey could be seen engaging in a heated exchange with several people after his child’s urine landed on some of the passengers.

The man, who was visibly furious, defended himself saying the child is still young.

But a lady argued that while she could forgive the infant as he’s innocent, the onus should be on the father to ensure that the child at least urinates into a bag.

She then threatened to call the police if the father hits her.

After a while, the man did a flying kick.

The commotion on the Shanghai train lasted for close to six minutes, and at the ending of the video, the father and another man were seen calling some people to go over to “back up".

Seeing this, the child’s mother told the father, “If you have the guts, fight yourself, why are you calling people to help?”

Click here to watch the video.

While this may be a case that allegedly took place in China itself, Chinese tourists have been fast gaining a bad reputation overseas.

So seven college students from Guangzhou recently launched a campaign to shame Chinese tourists into behaving better.

They cycled over 3,000 kilometres to Beijing to exhibit 100 photographs of vandalism done by Chinese on tourist attractions.

More recently, Chinese tourists have been in the news for refusing to hand over 30 sets of stainless steel tableware while onboard a Singapore Airlines flight.

Meanwhile, photos of a small boy urinating into a rubbish bin in an upscale Canadian shopping mall have also been circulating online.

A boy urinates in a bin in an upscale Canadian shopping mall. (Photo courtesy of Brandon Beavis's Twitter)A boy urinates in a bin in an upscale Canadian shopping mall. (Photo courtesy of Brandon Beavis's Twitter)

The photos show an Asian boy, with his pants around his knees, held by a woman as he stood on the top of the bin, at the Richmond Centre mall in Vancouver.

It’s not the first time that the Chinese have courted controversy when they allow their children to relieve themselves anywhere they please.

Back in 2010, a Chinese woman let her child pass motion in front of a store in an upscale shopping mall in Hong Kong, which caused quite a stir in the city.

Related stories:
Tourists on SIA plane fight to keep 30 sets of inflight cutlery
Some Chinese tourists 'uncivilised': top official
Nile relic vandal hunted down in China

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