Creepy spoof of local singer’s hit song goes viral

The parody has garnered over 40,000 views since it was first uploaded. (Youtube screengrab)

A creepy but wonderfully creative parody of Derrick Hoh’s “Forever” is going viral online.

The 4-minute story-within-a-music video entitled “Dead Girl Seeks Meaningful Relationships” is based on the dance-pop debut number by the Mandopop star, who shot to fame in the talent competition Project Superstar.

Last month, his first English single “Forever” climbed onto the Singapore iTunes chart for five consecutive days. And now this wildly popular parody, which has already been viewed 40,000 times since it was first uploaded last week, is sure to revive the hit song.

The creepy spoof echoes his lyrics of eternal love but puts a wicked twist to the idea of “till death do us part”. It begins with a morbid suicide crime scene where a ghost-like lady dressed in white lies lifeless next to a river.

The tale soon unravels into a comical chase for eternal love where the coroner at the crime scene falls in love with the dead body while the misunderstood dead girl looks for companionship elsewhere.

The video, punctuated by several mortified men who all die at the hands of the undead girl, is hilariously original but also horribly creepy. In one scene, her head pops up in the middle of the tub as a man is relaxing during his bath.

Produced by Shaun Koh and veteran comedian Jonathan Lim who also plays the coroner, the video is an homage to the typical horror film scenes of bathroom ghosts, hanging legs, dark alleys and smeared make-up of a haunted being stuck on Earth with unfinished business.

Watch the grim but funny tale unfold.

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