Body of Singaporean kayaker to be repatriated as search for the other missing person continues

The body of Singaporean kayaker Puah Geok Tin will be repatriated today, according to Malaysia’s state news agency Bernama, which added that a post-mortem on the body of the 57-year-old businesswoman had taken place at the Kemaman Hospital in Terengganu state.

Details of the wake will be provided to the public as soon as possible, Puah’s son said on Instagram last night.

“My mummy will be back soon after investigation and we will update on the wake details as soon as possible,” Louis Pang wrote.

The 23-year-old had confirmed his mother’s death on his social media accounts in the wee hours yesterday with an emotional post where he said: “Rest in Peace, Mummy. I love you.”

His confirmation came a day after his mother’s body was discovered in the waters off Kemaman, about 18 nautical miles away from Kuantan in Pahang state, where the kayak used by the missing duo was discovered.

Meanwhile, the other Singaporean kayaker, retired lawyer Tan Eng Soon, 62, has yet to be found.

Malaysian authorities had said that the ongoing search and rescue efforts would cover an air search area of 1,200 square nautical miles and a sea search area of 451 square nautical miles. Land search operations would cover 60km.

Puah and Tan were reported missing last Thursday after they drifted away amid strong currents while kayaking with a group of 13 other Singaporeans in the waters around the Endau Islands, situated between the Mersing coastline of Johor state, and Tioman Island.

Their kayak was washed ashore about 150km away near the Kuantan Port and had contained items belonging to them, including two wallets with Singaporean currency.

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This article, Body of Singaporean kayaker to be repatriated as search for the other missing person continues, originally appeared on Coconuts, Asia's leading alternative media company. Want more Coconuts? Sign up for our newsletters!