BRIEF-Fountain Set Holdings Says Says FY Profit Attributable HK$141.1 Mln

March 20 (Reuters) - Fountain Set Holdings Ltd:

* DECLARED FINAL DIVIDEND OF HK9.28 CENTS PER SHARE

* FY PROFIT ATTRIBUTABLE HK$141.1 MILLION VERSUS HK$160.8 MILLION

* FY REVENUE HK$6.61 BILLION VERSUS HK$7.51 BILLION

* ESTIMATED INDUSTRY AND FINANCIAL PERFORMANCE OF GROUP WILL INEVITABLY BE AFFECTED BY COVID-19 EPIDEMIC IN FIRST HALF OF 2020

* EXPECTS INDUSTRIAL & FINANCIAL PERFORMANCE RECOVERY WILL COME IN H2 2020 AT SOONEST Source text : (https://bit.ly/2xczXQB) Further company coverage:

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The other 48 per cent said they had no plans to leave Hong Kong.Fears over the national security law were more evident on a day-to-day life basis than at a corporate level. AmCham urges government to step up efforts to save city’s imageMore than 51 per cent of those polled said they felt less safe living and working in Hong Kong after the passage of the law, as there were no exemptions for foreigners in the legislation. More than half the respondents, or 56 per cent, thought the legislation was more stringent than expected.One unnamed respondent said: “Despite being a foreign passport holder, the law could be applied to me and there’s no confidence of any protection in the courts.”Another respondent said: “Far less safer. Rule of law is disappearing.”But one countered: “Getting violence off the streets makes all of Hong Kong feel safer. This law will help with that,” referring to the months of anti-government protests which erupted in June last year initially over the now-withdrawn extradition bill.Rebel City: Hong Kong’s Year of Water and Fire is a new book of essays that chronicles the political confrontation that has gripped the city since June 2019. Edited by the South China Morning Post's Zuraidah Ibrahim and Jeffie Lam, the book draws on work from the Post's newsrooms across Hong Kong, Beijing, Washington and Singapore, with unmatched insights into all sides of the conflict. Buy directly from SCMP today and get a 15% discount (regular price HKD$198). It is available at major bookshops worldwide or online through Amazon, Kobo, Google Books, and eBooks.com.This article National security law: US businesses in Hong Kong increasingly worried about legislation, American Chamber of Commerce survey finds first appeared on South China Morning PostFor the latest news from the South China Morning Post download our mobile app. Copyright 2020.

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Primary turnout a strong political message to Hong Kong authorities: activistPolitical activist Joshua Wong Chi-fung was the top candidate in Kowloon East, while two of the localists he endorsed – former journalist Gwyneth Ho Kwai-lam and incumbent lawmaker Eddie Chu Hoi-dick – came first in New Territories East and New Territories West respectively.Jimmy Sham Tsz-kit, convenor of the Civil Human Rights Front, and Democratic Party lawmaker Ted Hui Chi-fung were first in Kowloon West and Hong Kong Island respectively.Sunny Cheung Kwan-yang and Tiffany Yuen Ka-wai, both endorsed by Joshua Wong, came second in Kowloon West and Hong Kong Island respectively.Chung Kim-wah, deputy chief executive of the Hong Kong Public Opinion Research Institute (PORI), said the final results would be released on Tuesday at the earliest after they counted paper ballots of all constituencies and handled all problematic votes.The opposition camp held the polls to whittle down their list of Legco candidates from 52 to those with the best chance of achieving a “35-plus” majority in the 70-seat legislature. Running too many opposition candidates, they believed, would play into the hands of pro-establishment rivals by splitting the votes.Among the 52 candidates were 27 localist challengers, 11 activists from traditional political parties and 14 incumbent opposition lawmakers, including seven from the Democratic Party, four from the Civic Party, and pan-democrats Eddie Chu, Joseph Lee Kok-long, and Raymond Chan Chi-chuen. Hong Kong opposition camp’s landmark primary faces raft of obstaclesOn Sunday, several incumbent lawmakers from the Democratic Party and Civic Party had made an “emergency appeal” to voters. The moderate politicians found themselves in deep waters as they attempted to secure support in the face of challenges from young localist rivals who had opted for more confrontational tactics against authorities.Long queues were spotted outside polling stations across the city over the weekend, as a total of 592,211 votes were cast via a mobile phone app and about 21,000 paper ballots were cast in 240 polling stations during the two-day weekend primary.The figure, which far exceeded the original target of 170,000, represented more than 13.8 per cent of Hong Kong’s registered voters.The territory-wide primary came less than two weeks after Beijing’s imposition of the national security law on the city.The 52 candidates were running in all five geographical constituencies, as well as in the health services and district council (second) functional constituencies.Rebel City: Hong Kong’s Year of Water and Fire is a new book of essays that chronicles the political confrontation that has gripped the city since June 2019. Edited by the South China Morning Post's Zuraidah Ibrahim and Jeffie Lam, the book draws on work from the Post's newsrooms across Hong Kong, Beijing, Washington and Singapore, with unmatched insights into all sides of the conflict. Buy directly from SCMP today and get a 15% discount (regular price HKD$198). It is available at major bookshops worldwide or online through Amazon, Kobo, Google Books, and eBooks.com.More from South China Morning Post: * Hong Kong elections: primary turnout enables opposition to inch towards gaining majority in Legco polls, activist says * Hong Kong elections: traditional opposition parties, localists face off as more than 610,000 residents cast primary ballots * Hong Kong opposition camp’s lofty hopes for landmark primary run into raft of obstacles, voter turnout concerns * Hong Kong elections: 234,000 residents cast ballots in opposition camp primary for Legislative Council elections, organisers sayThis article Hong Kong’s traditional opposition parties lose out to localist challengers in fierce weekend primary for coming Legislative Council election first appeared on South China Morning PostFor the latest news from the South China Morning Post download our mobile app. Copyright 2020.

  • South Korean captured after third HK virus lockdown escape
    News
    AFP News

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