British parliament attack: The victims

Alice TIDEY
1 / 3
The victims included a woman in her mid-40s and a man in his 50s

Three people were killed in the London terror attack outside the Houses of Parliament -- two members of the public and a police officer.

Police said 40 were injured after the attacker ploughed a car along a pavement on a bridge before stabbing the police officer outside the parliament.

Here is what we know about the victims so far.

- 'Hero' police officer -

Unarmed police officer Keith Palmer, who was fatally stabbed as he stood guard at an entrance to parliament, has been hailed as a hero.

The 48-year-old husband and father was a police officer for 15 years, who was part of the parliamentary protection force.

Prime Minister Theresa May called him "every inch a hero".

He previously served in the British army alongside James Cleverly, now a Conservative MP, who tweeted: "A lovely man, a friend. I'm heartbroken."

Cleverly paid an emotional tribute to his friend in the House of Commons and asked that he receive a posthumous award for his actions.

A supporter scarf has been placed by Charlton Athletic football club on Seat 166 in the East Stand at The Valley -- which was held by Palmer, a season ticket holder.

- Mother picking up children -

Colleagues of a mother who was run down and killed as she headed to pick up her children said she was "loved" and will be "deeply missed.

A Spanish diplomatic source confirmed to AFP that she was a 43-year-old British citizen named Aysha Frade, whose mother was Spanish.

Media reports said she was on her way to pick up her two daughters, who are seven and nine years old.

Rachel Borland, principal of DLD College London where Frade worked in the administration team said she was "highly regarded and loved by our students and by her colleagues".

"She will be deeply missed by us," she added.

- Man in his 50s -

British police said the third victim was a man in his mid-50s but provided no further details.

- Injured -

Westminster Bridge is a busy tourist spot with its views of parliament's Big Ben clock tower, and the injured included many foreigners.

Police said 29 of around 40 people wounded were treated in hospital. Seven remained in a "critical condition" on Thursday.

Three French pupils, aged between 15 and 16, on a school trip to London were among those hurt, including two who suffered broken bones but were not reported to be in life-threatening condition.

The teenagers are from a high school in Concarneau, in the western Brittany region, and were joined by their families on Wednesday evening.

Five South Korean tourists -- four women and a man in their 50s and 60s -- were also wounded after being knocked to the ground by people fleeing as the assailant mowed down pedestrians in a car, Seoul's foreign ministry said.

In her address to parliament on Thursday morning, Prime Minister Theresa May listed four South Koreans as injured.

She also said that among the people admitted to hospital were 12 Britons as well as one German, one Pole, one Irish, one Chinese, one Italian, one American, two Greeks and two Romanians.

A woman with serious injuries rescued from the River Thames near Westminster Bridge after the attack, as well as her fiance, are believed to the two Romanians.

Local media in the eastern European country have named them as Andreea Cristea, a 29 year-old architect and Andrei Burnez.

Authorities did not confirm the reports.

The injured also included three police officers who were returning from an event recognising their bravery.

"Two of those three remain in a serious condition," May added.

Among the British injured were four students from Edge Hill University in Ormskirk in northwest England who were on an educational visit to the Houses of Parliament.

Two of them were described as "walking wounded".