Caf provides administrative and medical life support equipment to all national associations

The Confederation of African Football (Caf), as part of its development program “Contract with Africa”, will distribute administrative support accessories and medical equipment to all its national associations throughout the continent.

The materials that will be distributed includes at least five laptop computers, as well as medical emergency kits containing various key items considered essential for life support and other threats faced by professional athletes on the pitch.

The program is in line with Caf’s commitment to equip the secretariat of its member associations in aid of their duties, while providing required support in the medical field, ensuring that footballers are looked after in the best possible and most efficient way.

“Caf is very committed to the programs of our members and we hope the equipment will be vital in carrying out of their administrative and medical responsibilities,” said Caf President Issa Hayatou in a statement.

This reaction is as a result of a number of incidents in the football world concerning players who have been struck by medical issues while on the playing field.

Livorno midfielder Piermario Morosini collapsed and died during his side's Serie B meeting with Pescara at the Stadio Adriatico on Saturday.

The 25-year-old fell to the ground in the 33rd minute with medical staff immediately running onto the pitch to perform cardiac massage on the player. The game was abandoned and Morosini left the stadium in an ambulance, slipping into a pharmacological coma before passing away.

Just over a month ago Bolton Wanderers player Fabrice Muamba was left fighting for his life after suffering a cardiac arrest during his club's abandoned FA Cup match against Tottenham at White Hart Lane, but thankfully in his case he was rushed to hospital and was able to slowly recover over time, having been released from the hospital this week.

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