Changi Airport's Terminal 5 ready in mid-2020s

Changi Airport's Terminal 5 will be ready in mid-2020s and the mega-terminal will be able to handle 50 million passenger movements per annum (mppa), initially.

This was announced Friday by Minister of State for Finance and Transport Josephine Teo, who is also the chairperson of the Changi 2036 SC project.

Changi Airport currently has three terminals, two runways and a total passenger handling capacity of 66mppa. It will have four terminals and three runways with a total capacity of 85mppa by around 2020.

When Terminal 5 starts operations in the mid-2020s, Changi Airport will have five terminals with a combined capacity of 135mppa.

Terminal 5 will be one of the largest terminals in the world and will be connected to the other terminals as well as to the MRT system.

Earlier this month, during the National Day Rally speech, Prime Minister Lee Hsien Loong also announced that a multi-use complex, incorporating retail spaces, lifestyle offerings and other services, will be built at Changi Airport. It has been dubbed Project Jewel.

Third runway for Changi

On Friday, Teo also said that a three-runway system will be implemented at Changi Airport around 2020. The project will be complex, with extensive land preparation having to be carried out first on the 1,080ha reclaimed site.

The existing Runway 3, currently used by the military, will be extended from 2.75km to 4km to handle larger passenger aircraft. Almost 40km of new taxiways will also be built to connect the runway with the current airport. New facilities such as navigation aids, airfield lighting systems and a fire station will need to be built as well.

In order to create a continuous and integrated airfield, the existing Changi Coast Road and the park connector beside it will be replaced with a new "at-grade" road and park connector further east, along the eastern coastline. Works are expected to start in the second half of 2014.
 
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