Customer's fury over slanderous note on receipt

An angry customer has called out a restaurant for its ‘racist’ staff member, who insulted him on the receipt.

“I won't judge anyone's personal ideas, but people should be responsible for their opinions in different identities,” Zhao Zhe wrote on Facebook, along with photos of the receipt.

“You can insult me ​​personally, but you can't insult my people. Thanks to the staff of the firehouse for ruining my good day.”

The receipt shows the person working the till had written “Ching Chong”, instead of Mr Zhe’s actual name, and the name of an employee from Firehouse Subs - “Pamela”.

Zhao Zhe was angry after an employee at Firehouse Subs changed his name to a racial slur on the receipt. Source: Zhao Zhe - Facebook.

A day later, due to all the attention the first post received, Mr Zhe wrote a more in-depth post about the situation.

He explained he ordered from Firehouse Subs at around midday on November 8, through delivery service DoorDash.

Mr Zhe’s DoorDash account is linked to his Facebook account, where his name is “赵哲”, or “Zhao Zhe” in English, he explains on Facebook.

Mr Zhe said there is no way his name was translated to the racial slur, which refers to people of Asian descent.

“My name on the receipt is changed by SOMEONE ELSE,” Mr Zhe said.

In the second post, Mr Zhe included a screenshot of text messages between him and the manager of Firehouse Subs, who tried reaching out to Mr Zhe to apologise.

“We have zero tolerance for this type of behaviour,” the manager said in the text.

“I also wanted to make you aware that the situation is being dealt with immediately with the employee who we have learned did this.”

The manager of Firehouse Subs texted Zhao Zhe to apologise for the the slur, explaining Pamela was not responsible for it. Source: Zhao Zhe - Facebook.

The manager then went on to explain the person who wrote the slur on the receipt was not Pamela, as it indicated, but another employee.

“She [Pamela] was signed into the register and by no means had any part of what one employee’s poor and embarrassing choice did,” the manager said.

“If my Facebook post have effect his or her life, I am apologise for it,” Mr Zhe said in his second Facebook post.

“I do not accept the manager’s personal apologize [sic]. The employees have this racial discrimination is the manager’s dereliction of duty.

“I do not need any compensation , I need an official explanation and apology from firehouse.”

In the comments on the second Facebook post, a woman, assumed to be Pamela said Mr Zhe’s Facebook post caused people to harass her.

“Yes you have ruined more than just my day. Because of your post people felt the need to harass me and make phone calls to the store and call me a racist,” Pamela wrote on the Facebook post.

Pamela then went on to explain she decided to resign from her job because she was “truely scared”.

Pamela also said the “manager” Mr Zhe spoke to was actually the regional manager and he had received his apology “more than once”.

“I’m truly sorry for the what the employee did but the company and all the other employees shouldn’t suffer because of 1 person who was immediately terminated,” Pamela said.

Since Mr Zhe’s Facebook post, the Firehouse Subs Facebook page has received a number of negative reviews, all of which complain about the “rude staff”.

“Our guests' experience is a top priority at Firehouse Subs and we're saddened to say that this guest was not treated with the heartfelt service we expect at one of our restaurants,” the Firehouse Subs store replied to all of the negative reviews.

“The local restaurant owner has taken action and the employee in question was immediately terminated. We have reached out directly to the guest and are working to remedy the situation.”

The person who allegedly wrote the slur on the receipt has not been identified by name, however Pamela in the comments of her comment on Facebook revealed the employee was 18-years-old and thought she was being silly and “meant nothing by it BUT now understands how wrong it was”.

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