Ex-Superman Dean Cain’s Hot Take On Egg Boy: ‘I Would've Knocked That Kid Cold’

Actor Dean Cain is no fan of William Connolly, aka “Egg Boy.”

A video of Connolly, 17, went viral over the weekend after he cracked an egg on the head of Australian Sen. Fraser Anning, a right-wing pol who blamed last week’s mass shooting at two New Zealand mosques on Muslims. 

Anning slapped the boy twice, then his supporters dragged Connolly to the ground. Police released Connolly without charges. 

But Cain, who starred in the ’90s hit TV show “Lois & Clark: The New Adventures of Superman,” said the teen got off too easy: 

Connolly became something of a cult hero for the egging. Australian Prime Minister Scott Morrison not only defended him, but said Anning should face charges for hitting the youth. 

The full force of the law should be applied to Sen. Anning,” Morrison said, according to The Associated Press. 

As a result, Cain’s comments weren’t exactly being hailed as a win for truth, justice and the eggmerican way: 

Others also criticized Cain: 

 

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A man reacts as he speaks on a mobile phone outside a mosque in central Christchurch, New Zealand, Friday, March 15, 2019. Multiple people were killed in mass shootings at two mosques full of worshippers attending Friday prayers on what the prime minister called "one of New Zealand's darkest days." Authorities detained four people and defused explosive devices in what appeared to be a carefully planned attack.
Ambulance staff take a man from outside a mosque in central Christchurch, New Zealand, on March 15, 2019.
People wait outside a mosque in central Christchurch where many people were killed in two mass shootings in New Zealand on March 15, 2019.
Police console a man outside a mosque in central Christchurch after a mass shooting in New Zealand on March 15, 2019. 
Police attempt to move people away from outside a mosque in central Christchurch after a mass shooting in New Zealand on March 15, 2019. 
An image grab from TV New Zealand shows a victim arriving at a hospital following a mosque shooting in Christchurch on March 15, 2019.
Police stand outside a mosque in Christchurch after a mass shooting in New Zealand on March 15, 2019. 
An image grab from TV New Zealand shows a victim arriving at a hospital following a mosque shooting in Christchurch on March 15, 2019.
Police officers guard the area close to the Masjid al Noor mosque after a shooting in Christchurch on March 15, 2019.
Police escort witnesses away from a mosque in central Christchurch after a mass shooting in New Zealand on March 15, 2019. 
Police attempt to clear people from outside a mosque in central Christchurch after a mass shooting in New Zealand on March 15, 2019. 
A police officer patrols at a cordon near a mosque in central Christchurch, New Zealand, Friday, March 15, 2019. Multiple people were killed in mass shootings at two mosques full of worshippers attending Friday prayers on what the prime minister called "one of New Zealand's darkest days," as authorities detained four people and defused explosive devices in what appeared to be a carefully planned attack.

This article originally appeared on HuffPost.