The Flash's Grant Gustin 'devastated' over the death of 16-year-old co-star Logan Williams

Chris Edwards
Photo credit: Jenny Anderson/Getty Images for Elsie Fest

From Digital Spy

The Flash star Grant Gustin has been left 'devastated' by the tragic passing of his 16-year-old co-star Logan Williams.

Williams, who played a young Barry Allen in eight episodes of The CW series, suddenly passed away on Thursday (April 2).

"Just hearing the devastating news that Logan Williams has passed away suddenly," Gustin captioned an Instagram photo of the two of them with co-star Jesse L. Martin.

Photo credit: Grant Gustin - Instagram

"This picture was early in the filming of The Flash pilot episode back in 2014. I was so impressed by not only Logan's talent but his professionalism on set."

Gustin continued: "My thoughts and prayers will be with him and his family during what is I'm sure an unimaginably difficult time for them.

"Please keep Logan and his family in your thoughts and prayers during what has been a strange and trying time for us all. Sending love to everyone."

Actress Erin Krakow, who starred alongside Williams in the American-Canadian series When Calls the Heart, also paid tribute to the young actor.

Photo credit: Erin Krakow - Instagram

"Heartbroken to learn of the passing of Logan Williams who played Miles Montgomery in several seasons of @wcth_tv," she wrote.

"Logan was a beautiful, warm, silly, and talented young man. He could always make us laugh. He was just shy of 17 and had what I'm sure would have been a very bright future ahead of him.

"I hope you'll join me in sending virtual love & support to Logan's family & friends during this very painful time."

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