Globe: 'Signal repeaters' slowing down network

Plagued by dropped calls and choppy reception? Globe claims the problem might not be with your telecommunications company.

Globe Telecom announced Thursday that it has filed a formal complaint with the National Telecommunications Commission against the use of signal repeaters that boost reception but hog bandwidth.

"They are installed in between trees, building windows, toilet areas, rooftop areas, and building spaces, making them increasingly hard to locate. As a result, Globe subscribers experience dropped calls as well as a significant dip in call quality and clarity," the telco said.

Globe said that monitoring found "a significant increase in interference cases in the National Capital Region, specifically in Makati over the last 3 months, with over 80 sites affected."

In February, Globe and NTC conducted inspections of sites where illegal repeaters were suspected to have been installed and the owner of an illegal repeater in Manila has already been issued a show-cause order, Globe said.

"Network and clean frequencies are important components for quality delivery of our services. the use of illegal repeaters in order to get good network coverage at the expense of others has no place in this society," Froilan Castelo, head of Globe's corporate and legal services said in a press statement.

Castelo said the telco has strengthened its partnerships with the police, courts, and the NTC to find users and sellers of illegal repeaters to make sure subscribers get stable, consistent and reliable reception.

Globe is currently upgrading its system for better 2G/3G coverage, call and data connections, on-time delivery of SMS messages, and fewer dropped calls, it said.


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