Iskra Lawrence shuts down her 'insecurities' as she poses in a sexy swimsuit: 'I can wear whatever the F I want'

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Worried that swimsuit is too skimpy, too sexy or just too likely to stir up some shaming stares from the haters? Wear it anyway, Iskra Lawrence says in her new Instagram post. 

On Sunday the model and body-positivity advocate posted a video of herself trying on a revealing swirl-print monokini swimsuit that showed off her curves. Captions reflect the self-doubts the mom of a 16-month-old son have as she poses in the mirror: "Can I wear this in public now I'm a mom? I'm too curvy, I'll look like I'm looking for attention. They will think I'm a slut. Or maybe just a bad mother. I should just wear my plain black suit."

The video ends with a defiant alternative, however: "Or: I can wear whatever the [f***] I want and not worry about my insecurities [or] about what others may or probably not even think and just live my best life." 

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In her post, Lawrence — who shared that she wrestled with these thoughts as she headed to the pool with her family — urged her fans to tune out that negative inner voice that makes them second-guess their bodies or wearing what they like. It's something even a top model like Lawrence has to do a regular basis. 

"Self-love, self-confidence and insecurities don't vanish — you just learn how to rationalize them, quiet them and bulldoze the [f***] over them because NOTHING should stop you from doing what you want to do or what you want to wear. Period," the 30-year-old Brit wrote. 

Speaking to Yahoo Life earlier this year, Lawrence shared why it's important to be transparent about how body positivity can be a work in progress. 

"[When] you post these photos of you in a bikini looking confident and happy, I think people assume or hope that that's it, she was fixed," she explained. "It's all perfect now. It's all happy. And of course that isn't the reality and that wouldn't be human. So I think what I've learned is the more I share that things aren't always perfect, that's helped me, because that illusion of perfection has robbed me from a lot in my teenage years and as a woman."

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