LA tech industry mourns Kobe Bryant

Jonathan Shieber
WASHINGTON, DC - DECEMBER 02: (Editors Note: Image has been converted to black and white) Kobe Bryant #24 of the Los Angeles Lakers looks on against the Washington Wizards in the first half at Verizon Center on December 2, 2015 in Washington, DC. NOTE TO USER: User expressly acknowledges and agrees that, by downloading and or using this photograph, User is consenting to the terms and conditions of the Getty Images License Agreement. (Photo by Rob Carr/Getty Images)

The Los Angeles startup community is joining the rest of the world in mourning the death of NBA superstar, entrepreneur and investor Kobe Bryant who was killed in a helicopter crash in Calabasas, Calif., shortly before 10 a.m. on Sunday.

Reports indicate that Bryant, his 13-year-old daughter Gianna Maria-Onore Bryant and seven other passengers were on board a helicopter traveling to Bryant's basketball training facility Mamba Academy. There were no survivors.

The 41-year-old NBA All-Star, Olympic medalist, Oscar winner and father of four was most famous for his achievements on the basketball court, but had established himself as an entrepreneur and investor whose reach extended far beyond the Los Angeles area that he called home.

"Kobe was loved in Los Angeles," wrote Mark Suster, managing partner of the Los Angeles-based venture capital firm Upfront Ventures, in a private message to TechCrunch. "He not only played at the peak of his sport but everything he did was quality from film, to books to philanthropy. It’s truly a sad day in LA.”

Bryant launched his venture career with partner and serial entrepreneur Jeff Stibel back in 2013, according to Crunchbase. The pair made a mix of early and late-stage investments in Los Angeles-based companies like LegalZoom, Scopely, Art of Sport, The Honest Company, RingDNA, FocusMotion, DyshApp and Represent.

Last year, the investment firm expanded with a $1.7 billion investment vehicle that was launched in partnership with the private equity fund, Permira, according to a report in USA Today.

"At my firm we have a saying, the greats study the greats. So I read about many captains of industry to learn about their journeys. However Kobe was more than a great. He aspired to be and worked relentlessly to be the best at whatever 'game' he decided to focus on. In basketball he was the best player of his generation. In writing, he won an Oscar right out the gate, in tech and investing he stood up an investment firm and quickly generated significant returns -- a $6 million investment in BodyArmor became $200 million," wrote Marlon Nichols, of MAC Venture Capital. "He was one of those rare talented humans whose effort matched his talent. I personally learned so much about focus and dedicating yourself to a goal from him. Kobe was beyond great, he was legend, he was a generational leader. Scratch generation leader. He was the kind of talent and leader that you see once in a lifetime."

Jessica Alba, the co-founder of The Honest Company, took to Twitter earlier in the day to share her own reaction to the news. And Scopely's official Twitter account shared a reaction, as well.

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During his time with the Los Angeles Lakers, the MVP and 18-time All-Star set records and helped architect runs to five national championships. Together with Shaquille O'Neal, Bryant helped make the Lakers the dominant team in the NBA in the early 2000s.

"Kobe was the rare combination of God-given talent on-and-off the court with a competitive athlete mindset that was unrivaled to the point it was called the 'mamba mentality'. Whatever he put his focus turned into excellence, whether it was an NBA championship, an Oscar, entering the VC game or -- most importantly -- fatherhood," wrote Upfront Ventures general partner Kobie Fuller. "This loss is shocking and puts into perspective how precious our moments on this earth really are. My heart goes out to the Bryant family during this incredibly difficult time."

While Bryant's sports career was storied, and his post-sports career in media and investing successful, his legacy is complicated by a sexual assault allegation in 2003, which was later settled and for which Bryant apologized, but did not admit guilt.