The Latest: EU chief says UK's Brexit offer must be reworked

EU chief Brexit negotiator Michel Barnier, background, is kissed by European Commission President Jean-Claude Juncker before a meeting at the European Commission headquarters in Brussels, Wednesday, Sept. 19, 2018. British Prime Minister Theresa May urged EU leaders to compromise and back her Brexit blueprint Wednesday, ahead of a key meeting of the bloc's leaders in Salzburg, Austria. (AP Photo/Francisco Seco)

LONDON (AP) -- The Latest on Britain's looming exit from the European Union (all times local):

3:30 p.m.

A top European Union official says key parts of Britain's offer to conclude Brexit talks fall short of expectations and need to be improved, just six months before the country leaves the bloc.

European Council President Donald Tusk said "the U.K.'s proposals will need to be reworked and further negotiated." He noted issues surrounding the Irish border and future economic cooperation.

The key stumbling block to a Brexit deal is an agreement that would keep goods, services and people flowing between EU member Ireland and Northern Ireland in the U.K.

Speaking before chairing a summit of EU leaders in the Austrian city of Salzburg, Tusk warned that time is running out to conclude a deal.

Britain leaves in late March but both sides are keen to seal an agreement in coming weeks to leave relevant parliaments enough time to ratify it.

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10:30 a.m.

British Prime Minister Theresa May urged EU leaders to compromise and back her Brexit blueprint Wednesday, ahead of a key meeting of the bloc's leaders in Salzburg, Austria.

Writing in German newspaper Die Welt, May said Britain "has evolved its position" and argued that "the EU will need to do the same."

With six months to go until Britain leaves the EU in March, major differences remain between the two sides. But May said a divorce deal is within grasp if both sides show "good will and determination."

May argues that the U.K. and the EU face a choice between her proposal — which would keep Britain aligned to the EU rulebook in return for seamless trade in goods — and an economically disruptive Brexit in which Britain crashes out of the bloc without a deal.