The Latest: Union says deal with GM offers 'major gains'

1 / 4

GM-HUELGA

ARCHIVO - En esta foto de archivo del 9 de octubre de 2019, Yolanda Jacobs, miembro del sindicato automotor, lleva un cartel de "UAW en huelga" frente a una planta de General Motors en Romulus, Michigan, EE.UU. En el 30mo día de huelga, martes 15 de octubre de 2019, hay señales de un posible acuerdo. (AP Foto/Paul Sancya, File)

DETROIT (AP) — The Latest on the United Auto Workers and General Motors reaching a tentative contract agreement (all times local):

___

2 p.m.

The United Auto Workers union's top bargainer with General Motors says a tentative deal with the company will bring "major gains" to workers.

Union Vice President Terry Dittes (DIT-ez) says in a statement that bargainers wanted to get a strong and fair contract for the 49,000 members who have been on strike for a month.

Details of the agreement weren't released, but it will include a mix of lump sum and annual pay raises, no change in health care and product guarantees for many U.S. factories.

Workers will stay on the picket lines for at least another two days while union committees vote on the deal. Then the entire membership will have to give its approval.

___

12:50 p.m.

Many workers who are on strike against General Motors say they're ready to go back to work now that their union has agreed to a tentative four-year contract with the company.

The United Auto Workers union announced Wednesday morning that it had reached a deal that could end the monthlong strike. Workers will stay on the picket lines at least until Thursday, when factory-level union officials meet to sign off on the deal. It also has to be ratified by the union's 49,000 members at GM.

Mark Nichols, a worker at the GM transmission plant in Toledo, Ohio, says his savings are running low. He thought the strike would only last a week or two.

___

11:40 a.m.

The United Auto Workers and General Motors have reached a tentative contract agreement that could end a monthlong strike that brought the automaker's U.S. factories to a standstill.

The deal was hammered out Wednesday but it won't immediately end the strike by more than 49,000 workers. They're likely to stay on the picket lines at least a few more days until union committees vote on the deal. The entire membership also must vote.

Details of the four-year agreement have yet to be released.

Workers left their jobs early Sept. 16. They wanted a bigger share of GM's profits, job security and a path to permanent jobs for temporary workers.

The company wanted to reduce labor costs so they're closer to U.S. factories run by foreign automakers.