Master P wants to 'build the next Disney'

Percy Miller, also known as Master P, has had a career that has spanned music, food, sports, and business. The entertainment mogul came on Yahoo Finance’s “On the Move” to discuss his sneaker line, his Millionaire Mastery masterclass, and even plans to create the next Disney (DIS).

“I feel that knowledge is more important than money,” Miller told Yahoo Finance.

That’s why he wants to impart his know-how in his new Master P masterclass, Millionaire Mastery Business and Marketing Conference, which starts on October 5th in New York City. He says he’ll highlight both his successes and mistakes with the aim of teaching tenacity.

“I tell people all the time commitment is what gets you to your dreams and goals,” Miller said.

Miller tells people that they just have to “get into the game when it comes to business.” And that’s exactly what he’s done. The New Orleans–native recently stepped into the footwear game with a sneaker line called MoneYatti.

“We went from high fashion tennis shoes, and now we’ve created a shoe that can compete with Nike (NKE) Adidas (ADDYY). Miller has also opened up a restaurant called Big Poppa’s Burgers, Chicken, and Waffles in his hometown.

MoneYatti sneaker

Miller, who attended the University of Houston and majored in business at Merritt College in Oakland, said that education changed his life. He now believes that his life’s mission is to give back. “Everyone has a purpose, and I feel mine is to educate the next generation and show them what I’ve been through,” he said.

The multi-platinum musician says that people who want to be successful in the business world need to embrace their fears. “Don’t be afraid to grow up, don’t be afraid to change, don’t be afraid to do the right thing,” he said. “Doing the right thing, you’ll be around for a long time, doing the wrong thing you won’t, and that’s been the key to our success.”

What’s next for Master P? He and his son, fellow entertainer Romeo, plan to expand their filmmaking partnership. “Me and my son are really into our movies because you can really tell your story through movies. We want to get good at that — We’re going to build the next Disney (DIS).”

Reggie Wade is a writer for Yahoo Finance. Follow him on Twitter at @ReggieWade.

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    South China Morning Post

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    South China Morning Post

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    South China Morning Post

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