Matthew Perry invests in Field of Dreams ballpark

Matthew Perry has invested in the ballpark from the 1989 film Field of Dreams.

The former Friends star is among a group of investors funding the Dyersville, Iowa baseball facility that was the centerpiece of the 1989 movie starring Kevin Costner.

According to The Hollywood Reporter, Matthew has joined investors including Hall of Fame player and Matthew’s childhood hero Wade Boggs in a private holding company called Go the Distance Baseball. The investment firm owns the field.

Go the Distance aims to kick-start a national youth baseball and softball training campus next to the ballpark.

The project is scheduled for a 2014 completion.

Perry confirmed his investment in a statement to the outlet on Wednesday.

“Field of Dreams has always been one of my favourite movies and having a chance to do just about anything with Wade Boggs is a dream come true for me. I'm looking forward to helping make this a place where young ball players from all over the country can come and make their dreams come true, too,” he said.

“And, if we hear voices coming from the cornfields we'll be sure to follow any and all instructions.”

President and CEO of Go the Distance Baseball Denise Stillman echoed his sentiment.

“Our group is attracting future Field of Dreams Movie Site lovers to a beautiful nirvana we are creating for children ages 8-14 several acres away from the iconic tourism destination,” she said.

The executive also praised the actor for his investment in the project.

“Matthew’s dedication to creating a wonderful legacy to benefit children mirrors that of my own, so I am very excited and the entire investment group is thrilled about having him on board,” she continued.

The Field of Dreams ballpark was building 1988 by Universal, according to The Hollywood Reporter.

Field of Dreams became a box-office hit when it was released the following year.

The Phil Alden Robinson baseball movie grossed $84.4 million worldwide.

© Cover Media
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