May the smallest man win: Danish penis contest

In Denmark, one of the smallest countries in the world, size clearly matters: a website has invited men to send in photos of their private parts and the man with the smallest penis wins an iPhone.

The erotica site, Singlesex.dk owned by Morten Fabricius, 45, recently held a competition for the most beautiful penis, and now the time has come for the smallest member.

"The smallest is the extreme," Fabricius told AFP. "It's a competition which is weird and funny and almost too much."

"It's a competition which is at the core of manhood, the most important thing for a man. There are so many unhappy men out there, who think you have to have a giant penis, but it's not normal to have a huge one."

Fabricius said he hoped the funny and quirky aspect of the competition would enable people to poke a little fun at a sensitive subject, and give them enough courage to post images anonymously.

The rules are simple: send in a photo to the website with your erection and a measuring tape next to it.

The man with the smallest organ will win, but women will also crown a winner based on votes from the site's female members.

Those two will win an iPhone, and second and third prizes are an iPad 3, Fabricius said. The competition runs until January 31, 2013.

"So far we have received six to seven images which are posted, but we have more trickling in, which we are vetting to make sure they are not stolen from the web," he said.

"Everything has to be bigger, and bigger, and bigger," he said. "It's incredible how the media has frightened people from showing themselves as they are," he said, in part referring to the porn industry.

Sexologist Vivi Hollaender said she gets a lot of inquiries from men who think their organs are too small.

"The smallest penis was 1.5 cm (just over half an inch) while erected," she said. The man had sent an image to her, and she said he had described having a well-functioning sex life.

"It is frightening how many men are worried that their penis is too small. It can really destroy their quality of life," she said.

  • Thursday #sgroundup: Body found of boy who made first call from Korea ferry: report 45 minutes ago
    Thursday #sgroundup: Body found of boy who made first call from Korea ferry: report

    Here are today’s top trending stories in case you missed them.

  • Look, don't touch: Flickr photo of the day 12 hours ago
    Look, don't touch: Flickr photo of the day

    If there's one car that's particularly sought-after among today's well-heeled car collectors, a Ferrari 250 would be it. Usually it's the GTO variant, like the 1963 that sold for a record $52 million last year. A 250 of any sorts demands unfathomable cash, however, which is why we can but gawk at this 250 Testa Rossa. It's as close as any mere mortal will ever come to owning one.

  • Peeling out at Octane Academy, the free driving school for Ford ST owners 13 hours ago
    Peeling out at Octane Academy, the free driving school for Ford ST owners

    Buyers of Ferraris or Jaguars are used to perks from manufacturers – including racetrack lessons to help master their exotic machines. But for enthusiasts on a tighter budget, the Ford ST Octane Academy might be the sweetest deal in motoring: Buy a Ford Fiesta ST or Focus ST hatchback, and the reward is a free day of training at one of America’s longest, most-lavish road courses.

  • David Moyes statement after Man United firing
    David Moyes statement after Man United firing

    Statement released by David Moyes on Wednesday, a day after Manchester United announced he left as manager after less than a season in charge.

  • Indonesian general says his flashy watch is a fake
    Indonesian general says his flashy watch is a fake

    JAKARTA, Indonesia (AP) — Indonesia's military commander said critics who called him out for wearing an especially luxurious watch should be quiet because the timepiece is actually a cheap Chinese fake.

  • Pirates kidnap three on Singapore tanker off Malaysia
    Pirates kidnap three on Singapore tanker off Malaysia

    Armed pirates boarded a Singapore-managed oil tanker in the Strait of Malacca, kidnapping three Indonesian crew and stealing some of the vessel's shipment of diesel fuel, the International Maritime Bureau said Wednesday. The attack occurred early Tuesday off Malaysia's west coast, said Noel Choong, head of IMB's Kuala Lumpur-based piracy reporting centre. The diesel oil tanker was believed to be en route to Myanmar. "IMB is aware of the attack on the Singapore-managed ship in the Malacca Straits.