Motorcycle Group Calls for Proper Identification of Modification Clause in Motoring-Related Laws

Ruben Manahan IV

The community of motorcycle riders is currently pushing to amend the anti-modification clause stated in the Philippines’ current motoring laws.

In a statement, the Riders of the Philippines said that the rules and regulations on motorcycles issued by the Land Transportation Office (LTO) have been prohibitive despite the lack of “specific law on the apprehension and/or confiscation of aftermarket” parts.

“As of this writing, there is no specific law on the apprehension and/or confiscation of aftermarket mufflers (and other components such as handle bars, rear sets, etc) to guide both apprehensions and its users,” the group said.

According to them, the law must be specific and objective “to which all concerned can follow and use as an Implementing Rule and Regulation (IRR).”

Currently, the Constitution has several laws that are subject to misinterpretation with regards to modification of vehicles, namely Republic Act 4136 (Land Transportation and Traffic Code) and Presidential Decree 96 (Declaring unlawful the use or attachment of sirens, bells, horns, whistles, or similar gadgets that emit exceptionally loud or startling sounds, including domelights and other signalling or flashing devices on motor vehicles and providing certain exceptions therefor), among others.

“The focus mainly on the term ‘modification’ where anything that is not OEM (original equipment manufacturer), is deemed illegal and subject for apprehension in spite of the Motor Vehicle Inspection System (MVIS) that lists all the regulations thereof. Our stand is ‘If it’s not listed, it’s not illegal,'” the group added.

According to the group, the term ‘modification’ is being abused to extort riders.

“The apprehensions being applied to motorcyclists does not even affect the overall safety of our vehicles. But since it is not OEM, enforcement has deemed them as an excuse to subjectively apprehend riders,” the Riders of the Philippines explained.

The group further noted that they have been drawing up draft laws. “That way, we can ensure that enforcement does not use the term ‘modification’ to legally/illegally extort riders and guide motorcycle users in the proper use and application of such.”

Riders of the Philippines’ Jobert Bolanos told CARMUDI PHILIPPINES that currently, their move to amend the modification clause is being supported by Senator JV Ejercito, and Representatives Winnie Castelo of Quezon City and Ruffy Biazon of Muntinlupa.

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