Octomom poses in semi-nude photos for cash

LOS ANGELES (AP) — Financial struggles have led "Octomom" Nadya Suleman to pose semi-nude in photographs to run alongside a paid interview in a British magazine, her attorney said Tuesday.

With 14 children to care for, Suleman can't hold down a regular job to pay bills, lawyer Jeff Czech said.

"She's not doing well. She's struggling financially and she does whatever she can," Czech told The Associated Press.

In photos posted to TMZ.com and published in Britain's Closer magazine, Suleman wears panties and little else.

In an interview with TMZ's television show, Suleman said she didn't expect the photos to reach American readers so quickly, but she's not ashamed of posing for the magazine.

"I'm doing what I need to do to take care of my kids," Suleman said.

Czech declined to disclose how much Suleman was paid for the photo shoot and interview.

When Suleman gave birth to octuplets in 2009, she was an unemployed single mother who already had six other children. All her children were conceived through in vitro fertility treatments.

Her octuplets are the world's longest-surviving set.

Since the birth, she has cut deals with media outlets and posed in tabloid photo spreads to earn a living. She has promoted spaying and neutering for an animal rights group and gotten beat up in a celebrity boxing match.

In 2009, Suleman declined a million-dollar offer to appear in pornography.

Last year, she told Oprah Winfrey she was addicted to having children and called herself stupid for her financial problems.

___

Associated Press writer Jeff Wilson contributed to this report from Los Angeles.

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