Parents told to stop using euphemisms for their child's down-there body parts

Parents are being urged to teach children the correct terms for body parts [Photo: Getty]

Parents are being urged to stop using euphemisms to describe body parts to children and use the correct terms instead.

Tinkle, flower, front bottom... there are many words parents use to refer to down-there body parts. But, according to one charity it isn’t a good idea.

Eve Appeal, a UK-based gynaecological charity, said male and female body parts shouldn’t be shrouded in secrecy and urged mothers and fathers to have open conversations with their children about the subject.

A poll by the charity found that 44% of parents regularly use euphemisms, with less than a fifth (19%) admitting to frequently saying "vagina" and only 1% regularly using the word "vulva".

Just over a fifth (22%) of parents said they never refer to female body parts in front of their daughter, according to the survey.

The study, of 1,175 parents, also found almost a third (31%) felt it was only appropriate to use anatomical language when their daughters reached the age of 11 or older.

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Following the eye-opening research, the charity has created a set of tips called ‘Educating Eve’ to help parents talk honestly and openly with their children about body parts.

"The results of this research show just how wide the knowledge gap is around gynae health,” Athena Lamnisos, chief executive of the Eve Appeal.

"We must address both the lack of knowledge and any stigma by opening conversations across the generations about women's health now to give women the best chance of living healthy lives.

"We all need to use the right words about our bodies from the start."

'You call it a what mum?' [Photo: Getty]

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It isn’t the first time parents have been encouraged to use the correct terms for body parts from an early age.

Back in 2017 the NHS claimed that using various jokey words to refer to the penis or vagina can be confusing for children.

Instead parents are being urged to “tell it like it is and use accurate terms from an early age.”

The trust explains that while adults can often view these words as sexual, they’re actually not, and children won’t view them as ‘dirty’ words unless we teach them to do so.

That means using the actual medical terms for our bits, and not glossing over or telling children off when they use the correct terms either.

NHS Greater Glasgow and Clyde (NHSGGC) explains that while adults can often view these words as sexual, they’re actually not, and children won’t view them as ‘dirty’ words unless we teach them to do so.

That means using the actual medical terms for our bits, and not glossing over or telling children off when they use the correct terms either.