Philippines bars unvaccinated from public transport in Metro Manila

·1-min read
People wearing face masks and shields to protect themselves against the COVID-19 coronavirus wait for public transport on a street in Manila on September 7, 2021, a day before the authorities lift a stay-at-home order amid record infections fuelled by the contagious Delta variant. (Photo by Ted ALJIBE / AFP) (Photo by TED ALJIBE/AFP via Getty Images)
FILE PHOTO: People wearing face masks and shields to protect themselves against the COVID-19 coronavirus wait for public transport on a street in Manila on September 7, 2021. The Philippines bars unvaccinated people from public transport in Metro Manila. (Photo by TED ALJIBE/AFP via Getty Images)

By Andreo Calonzo

The Philippines has banned unvaccinated individuals from public transport in the capital following President Rodrigo Duterte’s order to restrict their movement as COVID-19 infections surge.

Commuters are required to show proofs of vaccination before riding buses, jeepneys, trains and other public transport in Metro Manila, the transportation department said Wednesday. The “no vaccination, no ride” policy will be in effect while the capital is under Alert Level 3, the third-highest in a five-step scale.

A member of the Philippine National Police checks a bus to make sure the passengers follow COVID-19 health protocols at a police checkpoint in Quezon City, the Philippines on Aug. 6, 2021.  The Philippines' Department of Health DOH reported on Friday 10,623 new coronavirus disease (COVID-19) infections, bringing the total number of confirmed cases in the Southeast Asian country to 1,638,345. (Photo by Rouelle Umali/Xinhua via Getty Images)
FILE PHOTO: A member of the Philippine National Police checks a bus to make sure the passengers follow COVID-19 health protocols at a police checkpoint in Quezon City, the Philippines on Aug. 6, 2021. (Photo by Rouelle Umali/Xinhua via Getty Images)

The Southeast Asian nation has intensified curbs on the unvaccinated as daily Covid-19 cases hit record highs in the past days, filling up hospitals in the capital. The spike has also disrupted businesses from banks to airlines, and shortened stock trading.  

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