'Rust' shooting: Armorer Hannah Gutierrez Reed files a lawsuit against ammunition supplier

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Santa Fe County Sheriff Adan Mendoza and District Attorney Mary Carmack-Altwies speak to the press about the shooting on Oct. 27. (Photo: NICK LAYMAN/AFP via Getty Images)
Santa Fe County Sheriff Adan Mendoza and District Attorney Mary Carmack-Altwies speak to the press about the shooting on the set of Rust on Oct. 27. (Photo: NICK LAYMAN/AFP via Getty Images)

Hannah Gutierrez Reed, who had been responsible for keeping the guns on the set of the ill-fated Alec Baldwin movie Rust, on Wednesday filed a lawsuit against Seth Kenney, the man who supplied ammunition to the production. She accused him of having given them both dummy rounds and live bullets, which resulted in the death of cinematographer Halyna Hutchins and injury to director Joel Souza.

Hutchins died Oct. 21, after Baldwin discharged a prop gun on the New Mexico set of the Western. Baldwin has said that he had been told the weapon was "cold," meaning it did not contain live ammunition, and that he did not actually pull the trigger. In his first interview after the tragedy, Baldwin also said he had "no idea" how a live bullet — rather than a dummy one — had come to be at their set on the Bonanza Creek Ranch. His words echoed a statement Reed had given earlier.

Alec Baldwin was the star of the ill-fated movie
Alec Baldwin was the star of the ill-fated movie Rust. (Photo: Mark Sagliocco/Getty Images for National Geographic)

According to an affidavit obtained by Variety, Kenney told investigators Oct. 29 that, through a friend, he had obtained "reloaded ammunition" — which had already been fired but was remade — "a couple years back." It featured the same logo as the dummy rounds and blanks he gives to films, such as Rust. However, Kenney, the owner of Albuquerque-based PDQ Arm & Prop, later told ABC News that each round is checked before being sent out to movie sets. "It's not a possibility that they came from PDQ or from myself personally," he said.

The Los Angeles Times reported in November that Kenney had been brought in as an "armorer mentor," according to a crew list the newspaper had obtained.

The new lawsuit, filed in New Mexico, details the process that Reed followed to keep the guns on the set safe. It says that Reed had reached out to Baldwin to offer further training on the move that he was supposed to do in the scene when the gun went off, but she had not heard back from him. She also alleges that David Halls, the movie's assistant director, had not told her they were about to work on a scene involving a gun, so she wasn't nearby.

As police continue to investigate the shooting, Reed's lawsuit is only the latest to emerge.

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