SLAMcore just raised $16M to help robots get around

·2-min read

The more of our world we share with robots, the more important it is to help them find their way. Founded in 2016, navigation is at the heart of what London-based SLAMcore does. In fact, it’s right there in the name -- SLAM being a common robotics acronym for “Simultaneous localization and mapping.”

The company has developed technologies that can be deployed on a wide range of robotics systems, from vacuums to the more advanced autonomous systems being deployed in warehouses across the U.S. Its algorithms are used to help robots identify the space they’re navigating. The firm also cites a key buzzword -- noting that such systems can be applied for finding one’s way around the metaverse.

Fittingly, SLAMcore notes that Meta has already begun to use some of its existing technolgoies. There’s also been a fair amount of financial interest in the firm, as the pandemic has radically accelerated the adoption of robotics and automation over the last couple of years. Today it’s announcing a $16 million Series A.

The round was led by ROBO Global Ventures and Presidio Ventures. Samsung Ventures, Toyota Ventures and Yamato Holdings also joined the round, along with Amadeus Capital, Global Brain, IP Group, MMC and Octopus. This follows a $5 million seed round raised by the company toward the outset of the pandemic.

“For far too long, robots have not been able to navigate physical spaces with the level of accuracy and efficiency that we know is possible,” founder and CEO Owen Nicholson said in a release. “As they become more available to companies and consumers alike in years to come, SLAMcore is determined to ensure that as many designers as possible have access to the algorithms needed to optimize their products.”

The firm says the round will go toward expanding its consumer-grade suite of offerings.

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