SPCA opens Community Animal Clinic to provide better treatments for community animals

SPCA's newly-upgraded Community Animal Clinic is equipped with more advanced diagnostic capabilities, and provides a broader spectrum of medical treatments. (PHOTO: Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals)

SINGAPORE — For several decades, the Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (SPCA) has been running a basic veterinary clinic for the public.

On Saturday (6 July), it officially opened its recently upgraded Community Animal Clinic, which is equipped with more advanced diagnostic capabilities such as x-ray and blood-testing machines, and provides a broader spectrum of medical treatments for community animals.

The not-for-profit clinic, which was opened by Desmond Lee, Minister for Social and Family Development and Second Minister for National Development, will serve SPCA’s rescued animals in addition to those under the care of animal welfare groups and community caregivers.

“The SPCA is committed to improving animal welfare in Singapore by working with and supporting the animal protection community,” SPCA executive director, Dr Jaipal Singh Gill, said.

“Our upgraded Community Animal Clinic, with its enhanced veterinary capability and capacity, allows us to increase our impact in terms of promoting animal well-being, alleviating suffering and saving lives.”

SPCA embarked upon making a significant upgrade of veterinary capabilities after moving to its present premises at Sungei Tengah in 2017, with a vision to provide subsidised and quality healthcare for community animals, and pets from low-income households.

The number of surgeries performed monthly has increased by 20 per cent, and this has enabled the clinic to better support vital humane population management programmes, namely the nationwide Trap-Neuter-Release-Manage programme for dogs and the Stray Cat Sterilisation Programme.

Flute, an abandoned cat with a damaged spine, has been undergoing physiotherapy sessions in at SPCA's Community Animal Clinic, and has also been fitted with a set of wheels to aid its mobility. (PHOTO: Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals)

A recent success story is that of Flute, a cat which was abandoned in a cage at a void deck. After a thorough examination which included x-rays, Flute was found to have a damaged spine, which rendered its hind limbs paralysed, and also resulted in a loss of bladder control.

Flute has since been undergoing physiotherapy sessions in the clinic and has also been fitted with a set of wheels to aid its mobility. It is now waiting for a loving home.

An estimated $600,000 to $700,000 a year will be needed to support the clinic’s continued operation. SPCA has called for public support in terms of donation income to help sustain the clinic.

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