Surprisingly dangerous find in man’s lightbulb

A man has made a surprising find in a lightbulb which he believes could have led to his house being burned down.

Jason Whitaker, of Kentucky in the US, recently posted a photo of a compact fluorescent lightbulb on Facebook.

“I kept smelling something like electrical fire,” he wrote.

“I tore my house apart trying to find it and finally did. These light bulbs will burn your house down. It has been in this lamp for four to five years.”

Jason Whitaker smelled something burning in his house. It turns out a bulb was filled with bugs. Source: Facebook/ Jason Whitaker

Mr Whitaker discovered the bulb filled with “nothing but ladybugs”.

“You can see how close it came to igniting,” he wrote.

“I changed all the light bulbs. Please check yours.”

His post was shared more than 106,000 times.

“That's incredibly scary,” one woman wrote.

Another woman called it “insane”.

Dead ladybugs stuck in the bulb. Source: Facebook/ Jason Whitaker

These bulbs are sold in Australia.

According to BUILD, a website dedicated to building and renovations, it’s best to exercise caution when cleaning light bulbs.

Lightbulbs should only ever be cleaned when removed from the socket, be cooled down when handled and never cleaned with a wet rag.

BUILD added cleaning light bulbs can actually improve their brightness by 20 per cent.

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