Theresa May finally met some 'normal people' - and it went badly

Theresa May has been accused of studiously avoiding coming into contact with any actual members of the public as she fights to win the 2017 General Election.

The Prime Minister’s meticulously stage-managed campaign has seen her fill events with pre-selected Conservative members rather than voters, speak in workplaces after all the workers had gone home, and list a rally in Scotland as a child’s birthday party.

Journalists have also complained that Mrs May is keeping them at arm’s length, only answering pre-approved questions and excluding certain media from events.

But the PM finally found herself face-to-face with a real-life voter earlier today. The exchange didn’t quite go to plan, with Mrs May unable to mention her ‘strong and stable leadership’ a single time during the exchange.

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As she walked around Abingdon market Cathy Mohan, who lives in Oxfordshire, confronted Mrs May over her party’s cuts to disability benefits.

She told the Prime Minister that she wanted her Disability Living Allowance restored, saying: ‘I can’t live on £100 a month.

Theresa, are you going to help people with learning disabilities? I’m being serious I want you to do something for us.’

Theresa May is confronted by an angry voter (Reuters)

 

Mrs May responded by saying that her party had ‘a lot of plans for people with mental health in particular’, to which Cathy responded: ‘And learning disabilities, because I’ve got mild learning disabilities and I haven’t got a carer at the moment, and I’m angry.

‘And I would like somebody to help me, because I can’t do everything I want to do.

‘I’m talking about everybody, not just me. I’m talking about everybody who’s got mental health and learning disabilities. I want them not to have their money taken away from them and being crippled.

‘The fat cats keep all the money and us lot get nothing.’

The confrontation came as the Tories attempted to win over Labour voters by portraying themselves as the party of working people.

The party announced new pledges regarding workers’ rights, including legal entitlement for time off to care for loved ones full time, new rights for people on temporary contracts and statutory leave for child bereavement.