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Tribit StormBox Flow review: simple and effective with an incredible battery life

 The Tribit Stormbox Flow placed on top of a bench.
The Tribit Stormbox Flow placed on top of a bench.

Tribit StormBox Flow: Two-minute review

The Tribit StormBox Flow is a neat portable Bluetooth speaker that packs more of a punch than you’d expect. It’s certainly not stylish but if you look past that and appreciate how simple it is to use, it’s pretty good value for money.

The Tribit StormBox Flow sounds far better than you’d expect. At high volumes it struggles for clarity, but at more comfortable levels for your ears, it sounds crisp with some strong bass booming through.

That’s further helped by the companion app where you can adjust the EQ to your desired needs or you can just pick out a preset option with some reasonable choices available. It’s all simply laid out even if the app also lacks the wow factor.

Other useful features include being able to charge your phone via the Tribit StormBox Flow if you’re stuck for power. Also, you can pair it with another Tribit StormBox Flow for stereo sound which works well.

Priced at $79.99 in the US and £79.99 in the UK, it’s a little cheaper than other rivals among the best Bluetooth speakers in this price range, but there are some design differences in comparison to these.

There’s IP67 waterproofing to help it rival the best waterproof speakers and a robust build with tactile buttons for easy tapping. A strap on one end means you can grab it easily too, although it is a little weightier than some of the competition.

That’s the thing about the Tribit StormBox Flow. It ticks all the right boxes but it won’t stir up excitement. Not everything needs to be exciting and the Tribit StormBox Flow is certainly dependable. If that’s what you need, you won’t be disappointed.

Tribit StormBox Flow review: Price and release date

The Tribit StormBox Flow on a bench
The Tribit StormBox Flow on a bench
  • Released in August 2023

  • Costs $79.99 / £79.99

  • Available in the US and UK

The Tribit StormBox Flow was launched in August 2023 and is available to buy across the US and the UK. It's priced at $79.99 and £79.99 respectively, but the speaker is already discounted at third-party retailers like Amazon.

Like much of Tribit’s range, the Tribit StormBox Flow is well-priced, costing a little more than budget offerings such as the Tribit Stormbox Micro 2, while being cheaper than mid-range options from JBL like the JBL Flip 6.

It’s heftier than some of the most portable Bluetooth speakers like the Stormbox Micro 2, but it’s still fairly easy to grab and take places with you.

Tribit StormBox Flow review: Specs

Tribit StormBox Flow review: Features

Tribit StormBox Flow control app
Tribit StormBox Flow control app
  • IP67 waterproofing

  • Companion app and EQ button

  • Can pair with other Tribit Stormbox Flow speakers

The Tribit StormBox Flow is designed to be taken around with you easily. It has a loose handle on one side so you can easily grab it. It could also be hooked on certain things including a tree. Because yes, the Tribit StormBox Flow is designed for the outdoors. While it doesn’t look massively robust, it offers IP67 waterproofing.

It’s reasonably lightweight too although not quite ‘I didn’t realise it was in this bag’ level of light, such as the Nokia Portable Wireless Speaker 2. Battery life wise, it’s incredible. It has a massive 30 hours of playtime, which probably makes up for a tiny bit of extra bulk.

Bluetooth 5.3 helps here and also means drop-outs simply don’t happen. The speaker supports the AAC and SBC codes, although not AptX, but this isn’t really the kind of speaker you’re buying for exceptionally crisp sound (although, as we’ll see shortly, it’s still pretty good).

The Tribit StormBox Flow also pairs up with another speaker so you can enjoy stereo sound. It’s simple to set up via a couple of buttons. There’s an EQ button so you can rotate through an XBass and audiobook mode. More functionality comes from the Tribit app which allows you to create your own EQ settings as well as use one of six presets. It’s also possible to check battery life via the app with the time dipping a little if you enable XBass. It only drops to around 20-24 hours though, which is still more than good enough for most situations.

Finally, you can use the USB-C port to charge up your phone which is useful when you’re in a jam.

Features score: 4 / 5

Tribit StormBox Flow review: Sound quality

Tribit StormBox Flow on a bench
Tribit StormBox Flow on a bench
  • 25W drivers

  • Volumes goes high

  • Muddy audio after a certain point

The Tribit StormBox Flow manages to go surprisingly high when you crank up the volume. For a little speaker, it’s going to boom out amongst the pool party you’re having or if you’re simply relaxing at home. The bass is the most impressive part although it does turn into a bit of a mess if you crank things up too high.

Still, the Tribit StormBox Flow is packing a punch here. Pair up two speakers like I did and it’s surprisingly compelling with a wide soundstage. I enjoyed hearing Queen’s Under Pressure all around me. Listening to Taylor Swift’s 1989 album was also suitably vibrant, offering some smooth mids.

It’s an enjoyable listen all around. Just don’t be surprised if you lower the volume a little more than usual. Also, stick with the XBass sound mode where possible for the punchiest sound.

Sound quality score: 4 / 5 

Tribit StormBox Flow review: Design

Tribit StormBox Flow on a bench
Tribit StormBox Flow on a bench
  • Tactile buttons

  • EQ buttons

  • Simple design

I’m not a huge fan of how the Tribit StormBox Flow looks because it’s so simple and straightforward – it somehow manages to look less exciting than even the Bose SoundLink Flex, which costs $70 / £70 more than the Stormbox Flow. However, while far from a designing dream, it does all work suitably well.

On the top are all the buttons – power, Bluetooth, volume, EQ and a button for pairing up with another speaker. Each is raised ever so slightly so you can identify which is which without looking. Having a way to adjust the EQ without the app is useful even if it’s restricted to only a couple of predefined options.

The power button is a little finicky about how long you need (or don’t need) to hold it down but I have a sneaky feeling that’s more my fault than anything. On the side is the USB-C port, which isn’t obscured by a flap or similar to ensure waterproofing. It’s still fine though and doesn’t cause any issues.

Design score: 3 / 5 

Tribit StormBox Flow review: Value

Tribit StormBox Flow on a bench
Tribit StormBox Flow on a bench
  • A little cheaper than some of the competition 

  • Robust design

  • Unassuming 

The Tribit StormBox Flow is that device that will surprise you. It looks very unassuming and not exactly as stylish as something like the JBL Flip or Bose SoundLink Flex range but it works well.

Also cheaper than the JBL Flip 6, the Tribit StormBox Flow makes up for its lack of looks by making it more affordable for you to buy two, while also still being pretty loud. You just might not be showing it off to all and sundry.

Should you buy the Tribit StormBox Flow?

Buy it if...

Don’t buy it if...

Tribit StormBox Flow review: Also consider

How I tested the Tribit StormBox Flow

Tribit StormBox Flow on a desk
Tribit StormBox Flow on a desk
  • Tested over 10 days 

  • Used the speaker individually and paired with another 

  • 10 years of audio equipment reviewing experience

The Tribit StormBox Flow was my trusty companion throughout the last 10 days. It was by my side while I worked in my home office and thanks to its portable nature, I took it with me when I headed to the living room and kitchen for extended periods of time.

Different locations meant I could compare the Tribit StormBox Flow against the noise of my dehumidifier, the neighbours’ never-ending construction work, and more regular noises like the air fryer ticking away in the kitchen.

The Tribit StormBox Flow’s music choice was powered by my iPhone 14 Pro. I used a mixture of Spotify, Apple Music, and YouTube to listen to. Mostly, I listened to various genres of music including pop, rock, jazz, classical, and a few other random choices.

I also checked out how well the Tribit StormBox Flow sounded when listening to podcasts and other more talk-focused content like Twitch and YouTube videos on my phone.

  • First reviewed January 2024