Two Sigma Ventures raises $288M, complementing its $60B hedge fund parent

Jonathan Shieber

Eight years ago, Two Sigma Investments began an experiment in early-stage investing.

The hedge fund, focused on data-driven quantitative investing, was well on its way to amassing the $60 billion in assets under management that it currently holds, but wanted more exposure to early-stage technology companies, so it created a venture capital arm, Two Sigma Ventures.

At the time of the firm's launch it made a series of investments, totaling about $70 million, exclusively with internal capital. The second fund was a $150 million vehicle that was backed primarily by the hedge fund, but included a few external limited partners.

Now, eight years and several investments later, the firm has raised $288 million in new funding from outside investors and is pushing to prove out its model, which leverages its parent company's network of 1,700 data scientists, engineers and industry experts to support development inside its portfolio.

"The world is becoming awash in data and there’s continuing advances in the science of computing," says Two Sigma Ventures co-founder Colin Beirne. "We thought eight years ago when when started, that more and more companies of the future would be tapping into those trends."

Beirne describes the firm's investment thesis as being centered on backing data-driven companies across any sector -- from consumer technology companies like the social networking monitoring application, Bark, or the high-performance, high-end sports wearable company, Whoop.

Alongside Beirne, Two Sigma Ventures is led by three other partners: Dan Abelon, who co-founded SpeedDate and sold it to IAC; Lindsey Gray, who launched and led NYU's Entrepreneurial Institute; and Villi Iltchev, a former general partner at August Capital.

Recent investments in the firm's portfolio include Firedome, an endpoint security company; NewtonX, which provides a database of experts; Radar, a location-based data analysis company; and Terray Therapeutics, which uses machine learning for drug discovery.

Other companies in the firm's portfolio are farther afield. These include the New York-based Amper Music, which uses machine learning to make new music; and Zymergen, which uses machine learning and big data to identify genetic variations useful in pharmaceutical and industrial manufacturing.

Currently, the firm's portfolio is divided between enterprise investments, consumer-facing deals and healthcare-focused technologies. The biggest bucket is enterprise software companies, which Beirne estimates represents about 65% of the portfolio. He expects the firm to become more active in healthcare investments going forward.

"We really think that the intersection of data and biology is going to change how healthcare is delivered," Beirne says. "That looks dramatically different a decade from now."

To seed the market for investments, the firm's partners have also backed the Allen Institute's investment fund for artificial intelligence startups.

Together with Sequoia, KPCB and Madrona, Two Sigma recently invested in a $10 million financing to seed companies that are working with AI. "This is a strategic investment from partner capital," says Beirne.

Typically startups can expect Two Sigma to invest between $5 million and $10 million with its initial commitment. The firm will commit up to roughly $15 million in its portfolio companies over time.