Viral social media post claims Chinese wives are secretly feeding their husbands impotency drugs to stop cheating

Zhuang Pinghui
·3-min read

Some mainland wives are feeding their husbands drugs that induce impotence to prevent or stop them from cheating, according to a social media post.

The post, which was reportedly written by someone trying to expose the online shops that sell the drugs, claimed a handful of wives had been secretly feeding their husbands diethylstilbestrol (DES), a synthetic estrogen drug, to ensure they cannot perform sexually and, the logic goes, ditch their mistresses.

Xiaoxiang Morning Herald reported that the post went viral, and screenshots showed some women had left messages below the claims saying the strategy had “achieved good results”.

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One comment said, “It took about two weeks after giving it to my husband for the drugs to take effect. My husband is now very good at home.”

Another person wrote: “My husband suffered sexual dysfunction after using it and asked himself ‘why?’. Don’t blame me. I did it for the family and will continue to use it on him.”

A reporter with the Xiaoxiang Morning Herald in Hunan province subsequently searched for DES on an online shopping platform and found some shops that did not advertise the drug but said it could be delivered with discretion.

The report quoted the unidentified shop assistant as saying: “You can ‘purchase’ other products but we will deliver [DES].”

50 grams of the drug could be bought for 90 yuan (US$14), 100 grams for 170 yuan (US$26) and 200 grams for 320 yuan (US$50).

“Many people bought it, at least 100 sales a month,” the assistant said.

Taking estrogen pills over a long period of time can be unhealthy. Photo: Shutterstock
Taking estrogen pills over a long period of time can be unhealthy. Photo: Shutterstock

The Xiaoxiang Morning Herald reporter consulted assistants of other shops and was told the drug was unavailable. One store said it could be only used on animals.

The South China Morning Post searched for the drug on major online shopping platforms and did not find any products for sale on Tuesday.

The assistant told the mainland reporter that the drug came in the form of an odourless white powder that could be dissolved in water quickly. One or two grams per serving could be discreetly added to a husband’s meal.

Luo Mo, a pharmacist with the Second People’s Hospital of Hunan province, told the newspaper that DES was mainly used for estrogen deficiency and menstrual cycle regulation for women, but it was being phased out as more natural forms of estrogen are now more popular.

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Taking this drug can affect male sexual function and should not be taken for a long time because it will increase the burden on the cardiovascular system and affect the metabolism of the liver, said Luo.

He added that the drug could also cause cancers of the genitals and was banned in food. It should only be used under the guidance of doctors, Luo said.

Yao Zhidou, a lawyer with Beijing Jingshi Law Firm, told the newspaper that husbands who suffer minor health problems as a result of taking the drugs could sue the manufacturer and sales platform for compensation, but it would be pointless to sue the wife since they share joint family assets.

However, wives could face criminal liability if their husbands’ health was seriously affected by the drugs.

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