Wild boar found dead in illegal poaching trap set up at Lim Chu Kang cemetery

The Animal Concerns Research and Education Society (ACRES) has called for better protection for local wildlife after a wild boar was found dead in a poaching trap at Lim Chu Kang cemetery.

The non-profit organization noted in a Facebook post that it had been alerted to the case in the wilderness of Singapore’s Western Water Catchment area yesterday, but the young pig died before volunteers could rescue it. A veterinarian assessed that the male boar died from the stress of being trapped in a tight cage. Severe bleeding had occurred when its hooves were heavily damaged in its attempt to escape, while a metal spring was found in the boar’s mouth, which ACRES believes could have been where the bait was.

The trap itself — made of construction metal, wood, and wires — was suspected to have been set up on site, which causes a concern for the other native wildlife that inhabit the Western Water Catchment area. ACRES points out that the region is home for many wild animals, including the critically endangered Sunda pangolins.

A similar case took place last October when ACRES had to rescue two adult wild boars and three piglets, which had been discovered trapped in a metal cage near the Central Catchment Nature Reserve.

Poaching wildlife in Singapore is considered an offense under the Wild Animals and Birds Act, which carries a fine of up to $1,000. Wild boars are not an uncommon sight here too, with many wandering into residential estates and onto expressways — sometimes causing serious traffic accidents.

“Singapore’s wildlife are never restricted to nature reserves, and they constantly explore and inhabit green pockets including military training areas,” reminded ACRES.

The Agri-Food & Veterinary Authority of Singapore and National Parks Board have since launched investigations into the case.

This article, Wild boar found dead in illegal poaching trap set up at Lim Chu Kang cemetery, originally appeared on Coconuts, Asia's leading alternative media company. Want more Coconuts? Sign up for our newsletters!