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Malaysian ramen chain allegedly makes employees pay RM500 fine for using the washroom during peak periods

Workers also have to pay penalties for using their mobile phones and taking sick leave; Minister says this system would be violating the law

 A viral photo showing a list of offences and corresponding fines has sparked widespread attention on social media platforms.
A viral photo showing a list of offences and corresponding fines has sparked widespread attention on social media platforms. (PHOTO: reddit/r/malaysia)

IT IS understandable that employers expect their employees to be at their best at work. However, a ramen chain in Kuala Lumpur is said to have implemented an extreme punishment system to keep their employees in line.

A netizen shared on Facebook on 18 February a list of guidelines that employees at the F&B outlet allegedly have to follow and the corresponding “fines” for each offence they commit.

For example, employees have to pay RM200 for using their mobile phones during working hours or breaking a bowl. They also have to hand over RM500 if they use the toilet when the outlet is busy.

Other penalties include paying RM100 if they take medical leave and RM500 if they inform their supervisor less than two hours before they are supposed to start work.

Employees should lodge a report if allegations are true, says minister

Social media posts with photos of the list of offences and fines have gone viral, reported New Straits Times (NST), with many netizens urging authorities to take action. According to NST, the chain has lodged a police report and refused to respond to media queries.

Steven Sim, Minister of Human Resources of Malaysia, told the media outlet that if the allegations are proven to be true, the ramen chain would be violating the law.

“Employers cannot deduct salaries except for items allowed by law, such as Employees Provident Fund, Social Security Organisation, and income tax. Salary deductions cannot be used for other purposes, including so-called disciplinary measures,” he said.

Sim urged those who were involved to lodge a report with the Labour Department so that “actions can be taken”.

In January 2024, a former employee of a Malaysian BYD dealership shared details about his unpleasant experience at work, describing it as a “Company Dari Neraka” (company from hell).

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