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Susan Sarandon Says Hollywood Hasn't 'Done the Cleanup' Following the Aftermath of Harvey Weinstein

"I don't think people talk enough about the people who facilitated the Harvey Weinsteins of the world," Susan Sarandon said at a 90s Con panel Sunday

<p>Stephen Lovekin/Shutterstock; Erik Pendzich/Shutterstock</p> Susan Sarandon on March 17, 2024 and Harvey Weinstein

Stephen Lovekin/Shutterstock; Erik Pendzich/Shutterstock

Susan Sarandon on March 17, 2024 and Harvey Weinstein

Susan Sarandon believes Hollywood has more work to do in wake of the #MeToo movement.

As Sarandon, 77, joined Mira Sorvino and Geena Davis for a panel at 90s Con moderated by PEOPLE's Editor-in-Chief Wendy Naugle in Hartford, Connecticut on Sunday, the Academy Award-winning actress addressed the fallout after the Harvey Weinstein scandal.

"I don't think we've done the cleanup afterwards that we should be doing," Sarandon said, after Sorvino, 56, spoke to how Weinstein — who is currently serving multiple jail sentences following convictions of rape and sexual assault— negatively impacted her career shortly after she won an Academy Award for Best Supporting Actress in 1996

"I don't think people talk enough about the people who facilitated the Harvey Weinsteins of the world that are still functioning that are equally responsible," she added, saying there remain people working in the industry who "knew when they were sending people to a hotel, who didn't pay attention when someone complained."

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<p>Stephen Lovekin/Shutterstock</p> Geena Davis and Susan Sarandon on March 17, 2024

Stephen Lovekin/Shutterstock

Geena Davis and Susan Sarandon on March 17, 2024

Sarandon, who began her career in the 1970s, also asserted that female sexuality is still "a mainstay of this business."

"So it's very confusing to be, you know, a young girl and know that they're checking on your viability according to how sexy you are. You know that right? You do know that there's something going on," she said. "They call it a chemistry thing or whatever they want to call it. But that is part of what you're bringing to the table. Whether you like that or not, that exists."

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<p>Presley Ann/Shutterstock</p> Geena Davis, Susan Sarandon and Mira Sorvino

Presley Ann/Shutterstock

Geena Davis, Susan Sarandon and Mira Sorvino

Sarandon's comments came after Sorvino, who is among dozens of women who have made allegations of sexual misconduct against Weinstein in recent years, said her "career was stifled" by the former producer and pointed toward 1998 as the end of her career making major studio films. Sorvino has previously shared that she feels her experiences with Weinstein and working with Woody Allen, who directed her in her Oscar-winning movie Mighty Aphrodite, have "tainted" her career successes.

"I stopped being a viable movie actress," she said Sunday, after apologizing to the crowd for tearing up while recalling that time period. "I still did indies and I still did television, but that was very hard."

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