Tan Cheng Bock's Progress Singapore Party formally registered, to submit party symbol

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(PHOTO: Tan Cheng Bock / Facebook)
(PHOTO: Tan Cheng Bock / Facebook)

Former presidential candidate Dr Tan Cheng Bock has received official approval from the Registry of Societies for his newly formed Progress Singapore Party (PSP).

In a Facebook post on Monday morning (1 April), the 78-year-old said that the PSP has been formally registered, having received in-principle approval last month. It will now submit its party symbol for formal approval.

“This will be the last step before we launch the party. I will let you know when the time comes so that you can celebrate with us,” said Dr Tan, who served as the Member of Parliament for Ayer Rajah for 26 years.

Adding that he had had breakfast at Clementi Shopping Center, Clementi Mall and 7th Mile @ Bukit Timah over the past few days, Dr Tan noted, “When we eat, fellow Singaporeans will often stop by our table to encourage us to keep working for Singapore.

“It is little acts like these that spur us to keep pressing on for the good of our country and our people.”

In January, Dr Tan announced that he was forming the new party with 11 others, including some former People’s Action Party (PAP) cadres. “I felt a sense of duty to come forward and represent (Singaporeans) in Parliament.

“So I decided to form a political party to add another voice in Parliament,” said the father of two.

In recent months, Dr Tan has been spotted having breakfast with Prime Minister Lee Hsien Loong’s younger brother Hsien Yang, fuelling talk of a possible political alliance.

Last July, he attended a media conference where seven opposition parties, excluding the Workers’ Party and Singapore People’s Party, came together to discuss the possible formation of an opposition coalition.

Dr Tan, who ran in the 2011 Presidential Election, lost to Tony Tan by just 7,382 votes. His subsequent attempt to contest the post in 2017 was thwarted when the government reserved the election for Malay candidates.

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