Coronavirus cases in Canada: Deaths in eight provinces as cases approach 17,000

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Total COVID-19 cases in Canada: 16,666 diagnoses and 323 deaths (as of April 6, 6:30 p.m. ET)

  • Alberta - 1,348 cases, including 24 deaths (361 resolved)

  • British Columbia - 1,266 cases, 39 deaths (783 resolved)

  • Manitoba - 204 cases, 2 deaths (17 resolved)

  • New Brunswick - 103 cases (30 resolved)

  • Newfoundland and Labrador - 226 cases, 2 deaths (28 resolved)

  • Northwest Territories - 5 cases

  • Nova Scotia - 293 cases (64 resolved) (1 death to be confirmed)

  • Ontario - 4,347 cases, 132 deaths (1,624 resolved)

  • Prince Edward Island - 22 cases (3 resolved)

  • Quebec - 8,580 cases, 121 deaths (231 resolved)

  • Saskatchewan - 253 cases, 3 deaths (81 resolved)

  • Yukon - 6 cases (3 resolved)

  • CFB Trenton - 13 cases

Note: Ontario’s overall numbers reflect cases and deaths recorded up to 4 p.m. the previous day, as per Ontario public health’s reporting practices. They do not include deaths or cases reported by other media outlets or sources after the 4 p.m. deadline.

Authorities in Canada are working to contain the spread of COVID-19, which the World Health Organization deemed a pandemic in mid-March.

Provinces and territories around the country have ramped up their testing, leading to an increase in cases, but also delays in results that may not reflect the most recent measures that have been applied by officials and citizens, such as social distancing.

On April 3, at least 49 deaths were reported by health officials across five different provinces, marking the biggest rise in recorded fatalities in a 24-hour stretch since the start of the outbreak in Canada. A day later, Canada reached another grim milestone as it surpassed 200 deaths related to COVID-19.

Officials say Canadians have contracted the disease while travelling in other countries from all over the world. Certain cases in Canada, which are linked to travel, have led to human-to-human transmission between close contacts. There have also been of signs of community spread in provinces such as Ontario, British Columbia, Newfoundland and Labrador, Alberta, Saskatchewan, Nova Scotia and Quebec.

In order to contain the spread, Prime Minister Justin Trudeau has restricted Canada’s borders, provinces and territories have declared states of emergencies, while people returning back to Canada must self-isolate for 14 days upon return under the Quarantine Act.

Those who don’t need to necessarily isolate are still being asked to practice social distancing. It involves keeping at least two metres away from others in social settings and staying home when possible in order to limit the spread.

Timeline of coronavirus cases in Canada - March 2020

For cases before March 29, 2020, see our timeline here.

Nova Scotia announces first COVID-19-related death

Date reported: April 7

On Tuesday, Nova Scotia officials said that a woman in her 70s from the eastern part of the province had died from complications tied to COVID-19. According to the Department of Health, the woman was in hospital, and had underlying conditions.

There were a total of 293 cases of COVID-19 diagnosed in Nova Scotia as of Monday afternoon.

B.C. highlights recovery rate as it announces 1 death and 63 new cases in the province

Date reported: April 6

Dr. Bonnie Henry announced British Columbia’s latest COVID-19 cases on Monday. They included one death, a man in his 40s who passed away in his home after community transmission, and 63 new cases.

Dr. Henry said he is the first person under 60 to die of the disease in the province.

Of 1,266 total cases in B.C., 783, or 62 per cent, have recovered.

“Our percentage of new cases has been slowing,” she added. “It’s a testament to the effort that everybody here in B.C. has been making.”

Alberta announces 1 death, 98 new cases

Date reported: April 6

Dr. Deena Hinshaw announced Alberta’s latest cases on Monday. One death was recorded: A woman in her 80s in Calgary who became the 11th person to die at a care centre in Calgary.

While 98 new cases were added to Alberta’s tally, 361 patients have recovered so far.

Four new cases in Saskatchewan

Date reported: April 6

Saskatchewan identified four new cases of COVID-19. In a positive trend, it’s the lowest number of new cases since March 18 and a far cry from the 18 new cases identified on Sunday.

The majority of the cases are in heavily populated areas of the province, with 127 in Saskatoon and 51 in Regina, followed by 47 in the North public health region.

The majority of cases are people between the ages of 20 and 44, representing 43 per cent of those infected.

A total of 13,680 COVID-19 tests have been conducted in the province.

New Brunswick total cases rise to 103

Date reported: April 6

Two more individuals have been identified as having COVID-19, bringing New Brunswick’s total number of cases up to 103. Both individuals are in the Moncton region; one is in their 20s, while the other is in their 40s.

Of the total cases in New Brunswick, 59 are related to travel, 33 have had close contact with confirmed cases, six cases are community transmission and five remain under investigation.

Manitoba identifies one additional case

Date reported: April 6

There are now 204 lab-confirmed cases of COVID-19 in Manitoba, officials announced on Monday.

The government has said there are 17 people who are hospitalized due to the virus, and seven of them are in intensive care.

Newfoundland and Labrador mark second COVID-19 death

Date reported: April 6

A second person with COVID-19 has died in the province, officials announced on Monday.

The majority of the 226 cases in the province (62 per cent) are people over the age of 50.

Almost all of the COVID-19 cases in the province are in the Eastern Regional Health Authority, linked to a funeral home in St. John’s.

Quebec announces 27 more deaths in province

Date reported: April 6

There are now 8,580 confirmed cases of COVID-19 in Quebec, and there have been 121 deaths related to the virus, officials confirmed today. Nearly 4,000 of the cases are in the Montreal region.

During a press briefing on Monday, Premier François Legault assured the public that social distancing measures were working, but would have to continue in order to overcome the virus.

"We may see the light at the end of the tunnel, but we must continue to do everything we can to win the battle against the virus," Legault said.

Over the weekend, police handed out hundreds of tickets to people who were not observing social distancing behaviour.

Nova Scotia expanding testing, identify 31 new cases

Date reported: April 6

On Monday, Nova Scotia said it is expanding its capacity to test for COVID-19, and its lab will begin 24/7 operations starting immediately. The province announced it had added 31 new cases, bringing the provincial total to 293.

Nova Scotia health officials said there are confirmed cases of community spread of the virus, but that this is to be expected based on the trajectory of COVID-19. Ages of affected individuals range from under 10 to over 90, and are from all parts of the province. Ten people are currently hospitalized for their COVID-19 symptoms, while the rest are self-isolating at home. To see a visualization of the data for Nova Scotia, visit the official government website.

Ontario added 309 new cases, 13 more deaths

Date reported: April 6

The province officially reported 309 more cases of COVID-19 on Monday, and an additional 13 deaths of people with the virus in Ontario. With a 7.7 per cent increase over the previous day, it’s the lowest single-day increase since March 31. There is an increase in the number of people who require hospitalization due to COVID-19 as 589 patients are currently in hospital, with 216 in the ICU, 160 of those on ventilators.

Ontario’s government also says that it has significantly reduced the number of COVID-19 tests in the backlog, reducing it to only 329 waiting to be processed (down from 11,000 cases waiting last week).

N.W.T. confirm a fifth case

Date reported: April 5

An individual with a recent travel history to Latin America has tested positive for COVID-19 in the Northwest Territories, increasing their case count to five.

After returning to Yellowknife on March 23, they immediately went into mandatory self-isolation with the other members of their household, according to a press release. The person is now "recuperating at home," after developing symptoms March 31.

As of April 5, health officials in the North West Territories have completed 1,255 tests for COVID-19, while 46 people are still under investigation.

Alberta sees three more deaths

Date reported: April 5

Health officials in Alberta have reported three more deaths, to go along with 69 new cases of COVID-19.

Of the three fatalities, one is a man in his 60s from the Calgary zone, one is a woman in her 80s from the province’s central zone, and the third is a man over 100 years old from the north zone.

The province’s death toll is now 23, while there are 1,250 total cases.

Among the province’s diagnoses, 152 are believed to be the result of community transmission, while 279 people have recovered. There are 48 people in hospital, which includes 13 in intensive care.

As of April 5, health officials have completed 64,806 tests for COVID-19.

Ontario surpasses 100 deaths, 4,000 cases

Date reported: April 5

Ontario’s Ministry of Health website reported 25 more deaths in the past 24 hours, to go along with 408 new cases of COVID-19.

The recent update brings the province’s death toll to 119, and its total case count to 4,038. Ontario is also the first province to surpass 100 deaths related to COVID-19.

Details about the 25 new victims are unclear at this moment. The numbers reported by the ministry at 10:30 on Sunday are current as of 4:00 p.m. the evening before.

Following Saturday morning’s Ministry of Health update, two more residents at Pinecrest Nursing Home were reported to have passed away. An additional death was also reported Sunday morning. Twenty-four people have now died in connection to the centre, which includes the spouse of one of the 23 residents. In addition, at least 24 staff members at the Bobcaygeon, Ont. nursing home have been infected.

Two more people also passed away early Sunday morning in York Region, where 16 fatalities related to COVID-19 have been reported.

Among the province’s cases are 1,449 people who have recovered from the virus. There are 523 people in hospital, which includes 200 in intensive care, and 154 on ventilators.

Five inmates and one correctional officer at the Grand Valley Institution women’s prison in Kitchener, Ont. have also recently tested positive, leading to a lockdown of 40 inmates, according to the Union of Canadian Correctional Officers.

Various news organizations have reported discrepancies in the Ministry of Health’s numbers compared to the tallies of individual public health units, saying there are in fact more deaths and cases in Ontario than what’s being reported.

Associate chief medical officer Dr. Barbara Yaffe said earlier in the week that their stats are “an under representation” of the most current numbers, but it’s on individual public health units to update their latest stats to the province’s database before updating their own websites.

According to the Toronto Star, who have tallied all 34 regional public health units’ statistics, there are 4,722 cases of COVID-19 and 143 deaths in Ontario as of 5 p.m. on Sunday. Toronto leads the way with 1,438 cases — after recording 206 new patients on April 5 — which includes 27 deaths and 140 people in hospital.

As of the ministry’s last update, health officials in Ontario have tested 75,046 people for the virus, while only 981 people remain under investigation, a low over the past two weeks.

Eighteen new cases in Saskatchewan

Date reported: April 5

Health officials have identified 18 more COVID-19 patients, bringing their provincial total to 249.

Of Saskatchewan’s cases, four are in hospital, which includes two in intensive care. Twelve more people have recovered in the past 24 hours, for a total of 67 resolved cases in the province.

There are 109 patients whose reason for transmission is linked to travel, 14 have no known exposure, and 55 are under investigation by public health. There are 71 who are listed to have contracted the disease via “community contacts (mass gatherings included),” such as the Christopher Lake snowmobile rally dinner held on March 14.

Eleven of the cases in Saskatchewan involve people who are 19 years old and younger. To date, 13,528 COVID-19 tests have been performed in the province.

Manitoba surpasses 200 cases

Date reported: April 5

Manitoba now has 203 cases of COVID-19, after health officials diagnosed nine additional patients.

Of the province’s total cases, 11 are in hospital, including seven in intensive care. There are also now 17 people who have recovered from the virus.

As of April 5, a total of 12,998 tests have been performed in Manitoba.

Nova Scotia identifies 26 new patients

Date reported: April 5

Health officials in Nova Scotia have diagnosed 26 more people with COVID-19, increasing their case to 262.

Two of the new cases include staff at Arborstone Enhanced Care in Halifax and Harris Hall in Dartmouth, which are both owned and operated by Shannex. One additional Shannex health care worker was diagnosed at the Jubilee and Concorde Hall retirement home in Quispamsis, New Brunswick.

Two cases of COVID-19 have also been recorded among staff at the IWK Health Centre in Halifax and Aberdeen Hospital in New Glasgow.

Among the province’s total cases, six are in hospital, while 53 have recovered from the virus.

As of April 5, the province has also seen 9,510 negative test for COVID-19.

Cases continue to be linked to Newfoundland and Labrador funeral home

Date reported: April 5

There are 167 cases, an increase of 14 in the past 24 hours, that are now linked to Caul’s funeral home in St. John’s

An unknowingly positive patient visited the home for a pair of funerals between March 15 to March 17.

The news comes as the province announced 14 new cases of COVID-19, all in the Eastern Health region, bringing the province’s total to 217.

Among the province’s cases, 28 have recovered, 10 are in hospital, including three in intensive care, and one recorded death.

As of April 5, Newfoundland and Labrador health authorities have completed 3,565 tests.

New Brunswick surpasses 100 cases

Date reported: April 5

New Brunswick is the latest province to surpass 100 cases, after health officials diagnosed three more patients with COVID-19.

The three new cases range in age from 30-59 years old, and are in located in the Moncton, Saint John and Fredericton regions.

Among their 101 cases, one is an employee at the Jubilee and Concorde Hall retirement home, which is operated by Shannex, in Quispamsis. Two other employees at Shannex retirement homes have also tested positive at two locations in Nova Scotia.

Fifty-eight of the province’s cases are linked to travel, 32 to close contacts of other patients, five are the result of community transmission, and six cases are still under investigation for COVID-19. Twenty-eight people have also recovered from the virus.

Quebec surpasses 7,000 cases, reports 19 new deaths

Date reported: April 5

Premier François Legault reported 19 more deaths in the past 24 hours, to go along with 947 new cases of COVID-19 throughout Quebec.

“As you can see, we are still in the ascending part of the [COVID-19] curb,” said Legault.

The recent updates bring Quebec’s death toll to 94, and its total cases to 7,944. Among the diagnoses are 525 people in hospital, including 154 in intensive care.

Montreal has the most cases in Quebec with 3,7131, up by 452 since yesterday. There are seven other regions in the province that have at least 300 cases of COVID-19.

As of April 5, to go along with its positive diagnoses, the province has had 87,992 negative tests for COVID-19, while 2,847 people are under investigation.

Alberta reports two more deaths

Date reported: April 4

Two women in their 90s at the McKenzie Towne long-term care facility in Calgary have passed away, according to Alberta health officials.

It brings the province’s death to 20.

Along with the fatalities, there are 106 new cases of COVID-19 in the province, bringing their total to 1,181. Among the province’s cases, 240 have recovered, while 42 people are in hospital, which includes 14 in intensive care units.

There have been nine outbreaks at continuing care facilities in Alberta, with 93 cases among them.

As of April 5, the province has completed 64,108 tests for COVID-19.

British Columbia reports three more deaths

Date reported: April 4

British Columbia announced three additional deaths and 29 new patients, which marks a low in daily reported cases this week.

“I don’t think I’m ready to say anything is a win yet. But every day we have been bending that curve is a good thing," said provincial health officer Dr. Bonnie Henry.

"The risk remains very high for us in B.C. We are in the thick of it and we must hold our line."

The most recent update brings B.C.’s death toll to 38, and its total cases to 1,203.

Among the new cases is a first at a long-term care facility in the Fraser Health Region. There are now 23 long-term care homes in the province that have experienced a COVID-19 outbreak.

Of the 1,203 cases, 149 people are in hospital, including 68 in intensive care. There are also now 704 resolved cases in the province. As of April, health authorities have completed 48,508 tests.

Nova Scotia reports its biggest jump in cases

Date reported: April 4

Health officials in Nova Scotia reported 29 new cases of COVID-19, increasing the province’s total to 236.

Of the province’s total cases, four are in hospital, while 50 people have recovered from the virus.

As of April 4, Nova Scotia has had 8,964 negative test results to go along with their 236 confirmed cases, which are scattered all throughout the province. Health officials said they plan on ramping up their testing since there is now clear evidence of community spread in Nova Scotia.

Saskatchewan identifies 11 new patients

Date reported: April 4

Health officials diagnosed 11 new more people in Saskatchewan with COVID-19, bringing their total case count to 231.

Among the cases, 55 people have now recovered. Four people are in hospital, which includes one in intensive care.

The reason for transmission for 106 of the cases involves recent travel. Thirteen patients have no known exposure, while 47 cases are still under investigation. There are also 65 people who are listed to have been infected by “community contacts.” Earlier this week, health officials said 24 people are linked to a Christopher Lake snowmobile rally dinner held on March 14. An updated stat has not yet been provided.

As of April 4, the province has performed 12,670 tests for COVID-19.

Twelve more diagnoses in Manitoba

Date reported: April 4

There are 194 probable and positive cases in Manitoba, after health officials diagnosed 12 more patients with COVID-19.

Among the province’s total cases, 10 are in hospital, including six in intensive care. Seventeen people have recovered from the virus, while the number of deaths remains at two.

As of April 4, a total of 12,514 tests have been performed in the province, according to a press release.

“New phase” in Quebec as cases soar

Date reported: April 4

Health officials in Quebec reported 14 more deaths in the province, bringing their death toll to 75, to go along with 896 new cases of COVID-19.

Quebec's national director of public health Horacio Arruda said they’re now in a “new phase.” The main reason for transmission is now community spread, which means that people’s source of infection can’t be traced, such as to travel or to another patient that’s a close contact.

Arruda believes that community transmission is prevalent all throughout Quebec, especially in big cities. Before, the main reason for transmission was the increase in people who were returning to Quebec after March Break.

The jump in cases brings the province’s total to 6,997. Among those cases, 478 are in hospital, including 130 in intensive care. Montreal now has 3,261 of those cases, which is an increase of 424 in the past 24 hours. There are seven regions in Quebec that have more than 300 cases of COVID-19.

As of April 4, the province has also completed 83,230 negative tests, while 3,879 people are under investigation.

Newfoundland and Labrador surpasses 200 cases

Date reported: April 4

There are now 203 cases of COVID-19 in Newfoundland and Labrador, after health officials diagnosed eight new patients with COVID-19.

Seven of the cases are in Eastern Health. The other is a worker at the Dr. Charles S. Curtis Hospital in St. Anthony, part of the Labrador-Grenfell Health unit.

Among the total cases, 153 are linked to Caul's Funeral Home in St. John's, where one patient attended a pair of funerals between March 15 and March 17. Eleven people are in hospital, including three in intensive care. Eighteen people have also recovered from the virus.

As of their last update, the province has tested 3,386 people for the virus.

Three new cases in New Brunswick

Date reported: April 4

Three more people have been diagnosed in New Brunswick, all in the Fredericton region, bringing the province’s case count to 98.

The individuals range in age from 20-59 years old.

Among the province’s total cases, 57 are linked to travel, 31 to close contacts that are infected with COVID-19, four to community transmission, while six people are under investigation. Four people are in hospital, including one in intensive care.

Two people have been discharged from hospital, and 28 people in the province have since recovered from the virus.

Ontario’s latest update pushes Canada past 200 fatalities

Date reported: April 4

Ontario’s Ministry of Health website reported 27 new fatalities, bringing the province’s death toll to 94 and Canada’s to over 200. It also marks the most deaths reported by a provincial health unit in a 24-hour span.

Along with the fatalities, Ontario recorded 375 new cases of COVID-19, increasing their case count to 3,630. Among those diagnoses are 1,219 people who have recovered, which is up from the figure the day before by 196. There are also 506 people in hospital with the virus, including 196 who are in intensive care and 152 on ventilators.

As of April 4, 71,338 people have been tested, while 1,336 people are under investigation.

It’s unclear who the 27 new victims are, but it marks the first time that the Ministry of Health has reported double-digit fatalities for three consecutive days. The numbers that are reported each morning on the Ministry of Health’s website at 10:30 a.m. are current as of 4 p.m. the evening before.

Following Friday morning’s Ministry of Health update, four more deaths were reported at Pinecrest Nursing Home in Bobcaygeon, Ont.

Two men in their 70s, one from Brampton and the other from Mississauga, passed away in the Peel region, while one more death was reported in York Region. Toronto health officials announced two more deaths Friday afternoon, but it’s not clear if they’re part of the eight fatalities that were reported this week at a Scarborough long-term care home.

One more death was also reported overnight in the Haldimand-Norfolk health region.

Following Saturday morning’s Ministry of Health update, two more residents at Pinecrest Nursing Home were reported to have passed away. Twenty-three people have died in connection to the centre, which includes the spouse of one of the 22 residents who passed away due to COVID-19 complications.

Toronto health officials also said there are now 1,026 cases of COVID-19 in the city, while 27 per cent of them are linked to community transmission.

Various news organizations have reported discrepancies in the Ministry of Health’s numbers compared to the tallies of individual public health units, saying there are in fact more deaths and cases in Ontario than what’s being reported.

Associate chief medical officer Dr. Barbara Yaffe said earlier in the week that their stats are “an under representation” of the most current numbers, but it’s on individual public health units to update their latest stats to the province’s data base before updating their own websites.

According to the Toronto Star, as of 10:30 a.m. on Saturday there were 3,800 cases of COVID-19 in Ontario and 113 deaths.

Alberta reports a COVID-19 death for the sixth day in a row

Date reported: April 3

Five more people have died in Alberta after contracting COVID-19, according to health officials.

Four of the victims were residents at the Mackenzie Towne long-term care home in Calgary, where eight people in total have now died. Dr. Deena Hinshaw, Alberta’s chief medical officer of health, said the fifth fatality involved a woman in her 20s from Edmonton. It’s unclear at this time is she had any underlying health conditions.

Along with the fatalities, there are 107 new cases of COVID-19 in the province, bringing the total to 1,075. Of the cases, 196 people have recovered.

There are 137 cases that are believed to be linked to community transmission, up from yesterday’s count of 108. Hinshaw says that each case is troubling, but they “are not seeing a rapid rise in community transmission,” instead the growth has been constant over the past 10 days.

As of April 3, the province has completed 61,960 tests for the virus.

British Columbia reports four more deaths

Date reported: April 3

Four more COVID-19 patients have passed away, according to provincial health officer Dr. Bonnie Henry, bringing B.C.’s death toll to 35.

Three of them are related to the Lynn Valley and Haro Park care homes.

Henry said there are now 22 care homes across the province with a COVID-19 outbreak, sharing a total of 176 cases. The majority are at Lynn Valley and Haro Park.

Along with the fatalities, 53 new cases of COVID-19 were diagnosed in the province, bringing the total to 1174. In positive news, said Henry, there are now three less people in hospital than yesterday; among the now 146 patients, 64 are in intensive care.

Of the province’s total cases, 673 have now recovered from the virus. As of April 3, B.C. health officials have completed 47,352 tests.

Saskatchewan sees 12 more recoveries

Date reported: April 3

Along with identifying 14 more patients, bringing the province’s total to 220, health officials resolved 12 cases of COVID-19 in the past 24 hours.

Of the new cases, four were recently added after being completed out-of-province over the past couple of weeks.

Among the province’s total cases, there are now 48 recoveries, while six people are in hospital, including three in intensive care. Three people have also passed away after contracting the virus.

According to a press release, 102 cases are linked to travel, 10 have no known exposures, and 56 are under investigation. Fifty-two are being linked to mass gatherings in the province. A couple days ago, health officials said 24 people are linked to a Christopher Lake snowmobile rally dinner held on March 14. An updated stat has not yet been provided.

As of April 3, the province has administered 12,112 tests for COVID-19.

Manitoba records its second death

Date reported: April 3

A man in his 50s from Winnipeg, who had underlying health conditions, has died after contracting COVID-19. It marks the province’s second fatality.

Fifteen more cases were also announced by health officials, bringing Manitoba’s total to 182.

Among the province’s total cases, nine are in hospital, including six in intensive care, while 11 people have recovered.

As of April 3, the province has performed almost 12,000 tests for COVID-19

New Brunswick diagnoses four new patients

Date reported: April 3

There are now 95 cases of COVID-19 in New Brunswick, after health officials diagnosed four more patients.

Along with the news, Premier Blaine Higgs said he’ll likely release the province’s modelling projections sometime in the next week to the public. The models will help predict the progression of COVID-19 in New Brunswick, based on recent trends and other analysis. Ontario released its models today, Quebec’s premier said it will Tuesday, while Nova Scotia and Prince Edward Island said they hope to also make their models available by next week.

Among the new cases, three of them are from the Fredericton region, and one is from Campbellton. They range in age from 30-69 years old.

Of all 95 cases, 54 are linked to travel, 28 to close-contacts with other patients, three to community transmission, while 10 are still under investigation. Four people are currently in hospital, including one in intensive care, but two have since been discharged. Twenty-five have also recovered from the virus, according to a press release.

Twelve more cases in Newfoundland and Labrador

Date reported: April 3

Health officials in Newfoundland and Labrador diagnosed 12 more patients, all in the Eastern Health region, over the past 24 hours.

It brings the province’s case count to 195. Among their patients, 11 people are hospital, including four in intensive care. Eleven people have now recovered, while there’s still one fatality.

In a press conference, health minister John Haggie said that people in the province need to take social-distancing more seriously. As recently as last night, there were house parties in the province, while he’s also been sent videos of seniors doing Zumba together in the same room.

As of April 3, the province has administered 3,201 tests, leading to the 195 positive diagnoses.

Quebec almost doubles its COVID-19 death toll

Date reported: April 3

Twenty-five more people in Quebec have died after contracting COVID-19, marking the biggest single-day increase a Canadian province has reported in terms of deaths.

Health authorities said that not all of the fatalities occurred in the past 24 hours. Instead, 20 patients who passed away days earlier were just confirmed to have the virus.

The recent update brings Quebec’s death toll to 61. There are also now 6,101 cases in the province after 583 new patients were diagnosed with the virus.

One of the most recent fatalities involves a person in their 30s, whose condition was aggravated by obesity, according to Quebec's national director of public health Horacio Arruda. The majority of the remaining fatalities involve people over the age of 70.

Among the total patients, 423 are in hospital, which includes 122 in intensive care. There are also 231 people who have recovered from the virus in the province.

The Montreal region leads the way with 2,837 cases of COVID-19, which includes their 29 deaths. The Montérégie region is in second with 583 cases, while there are seven other regions that have at least 100 diagnoses.

Premier François Legault said that the province will release its modelling data on Tuesday, following in the steps of Ontario. The data will predict the progression of COVID-19 in Quebec, based on recent trends and other analysis.

As of April 3, health officials in Quebec have seen 77,469 negative tests for COVID-19, while 4,233 people are still under investigation.

Ontario reaches good, bad and troubling COVID-19 milestones

Date reported: April 3

Along with reporting 14 more fatalities in the past 24 hours, Ontario’s Ministry of Health announced there are 3,255 cases of COVID-19 in the province, which includes 1,023 who have recovered from the virus.

Ontario reached the 3,000-case and 1,000-recovery benchmarks on Friday after health officials diagnosed 462 new patients and resolved 192 cases. The rise in cases is also the most the province has recorded in a 24-hour span throughout the outbreak.

There are now a total of 67 new fatalities in the province. It’s unclear who the 14 new victims are, but it marks the first time that the Ministry of Health has reported double-digit fatalities in consecutive days.

Among the province’s 3,255 cases, 462 of them are in hospital, including 194 in intensive care and 140 on ventilators to deal with the respiratory illness. As of April 3, the province has administered 66,753 tests for the virus, while its backlog of people still under investigation sits at only 1,245.

Following Thursday’s Ministry of Health update, two additional deaths were reported at the Pinecrest Nursing Home in Bobcaygeon, Ont. Three additional deaths were reported in Durham Region, bringing the region’s total to nine.

Brant County saw its first fatality involving a woman in her 60s with pre-existing health issues. Wellington-Dufferin-Guelph Public Health unit also recorded its first death, involving an individual in their 80s. A man in his 70s, who has a recent international travel history, also died in the Public Health Sudbury & Districts unit.

Following Friday’s Ministry of Health update, four more deaths were reported at Pinecrest Nursing Home. Twenty-one people have died in connection to the centre, which includes the spouse of one of the 20 residents who passed away due to COVID-19 complications.

Two men in their 70s, one from Brampton and the other from Mississauga, passed away in the Peel region, while one more death was reported in York Region. Toronto health officials announced two more deaths Friday afternoon, but it’s not clear if they’re part of the eight fatalities that were reported this week at a Scarborough long-term care home.

There are now 13 deaths related to the virus in Toronto, among the city’s 986 cases. Twenty-seven per cent of Toronto’s cases are believed to be the result of community transmission.

Various news organizations have reported discrepancies in the Ministry of Health’s numbers compared to the tallies of individual public health units, saying there are in fact more deaths and cases in Ontario than what’s being reported. The numbers that are reported each morning on the Ministry’s of Health website at 10:30 are current as of 4 p.m. the evening before.

Associate chief medical officer Dr. Barbara Yaffe said on Thursday that their stats are “an under representation” of the most current numbers, but it’s on individual public health units to update their latest stats to the province’s data base before updating their own websites.

According to the Toronto Star, as of 5 p.m. on Friday there are 3,497 cases of COVID-19 in Ontario and 105 deaths.

On Friday afternoon, Ontario Public Health released its modelling data, which predicts the progression of COVID-19 in Ontario based on recent trends and other analysis. Peter Donnelly, president and CEO of Public Health Ontario, said it’s an “inexact” science, but helps show what outcomes the province could face.

With the public health measures currently in place, such as social distancing, the virus is expected to claim the lives of 3,000 to 15,000 people in Ontario over the course of the pandemic, which could last up to two years. By April 30, about 80,000 people are expected to be infected to go along with 1,600 deaths.

Without any public health measures in place, the virus’ fatality rate would be 100,000 in Ontario throughout the pandemic. Six-thousand people would die by the end of April to go along with 300,000 infections, according to the province’s modelling data.

Nova Scotia surpasses 200 cases

Date reported: April 3

There are now 207 cases of COVID-19 in Nova Scotia, after health officials diagnosed 14 new cases.

Twelve cases were identified in the central area of the province, and one each in the western and northern areas.

Among the province’s patients, one is still only confirmed to be the result of community transmission, but “more cases are expected to present,” said a press release by the province. Five people are in hospital, but 21 have recovered form the virus.

Following the update, Premier Stephen McNeil said he plans on releasing the province’s modelling projections sometime in the next week to the public. The models will help predict the progression of COVID-19 in Nova Scotia, based on recent trends and other analysis. Ontario released its models today, and Quebec’s premier said it will Tuesday.

As of April 3, the province has also seen 8,234 negative test for the virus.

One of two new cases in the N.W.T. violates travel restrictions

Date reported: April 2

Health officials in the Northwest Territories have diagnosed two more people with COVID-19, bringing its total case count to four.

Unlike the territory’s first two cases, both patients live outside Yellowknife and Inuvik. Health officials won’t disclose which communities they live in due to privacy reasons.

The first of the two new cases involves an individual who returned to N.W.T on March 22 after travelling within Canada. Despite being asked to self-isolate in their city of arrival under mandatory travel restrictions, the person returned to their small community. The individual had pre-existing health conditions and was brought to a hospital in Yellowknife, where they are still symptomatic.

"The manner by which they were able to return to a small community and not a designated isolation centre is being investigated," said a press release by the territory. "Investigation of contacts is ongoing, but is expected to be minimal."

Violating travel restrictions can lead to a maximum penalty of $10,000 and six months in jail. It’s unclear if the individual has been punished.

The second new patient returned to Yellowknife on March 20 after travelling in Europe. The individual immediately went into self-isolation and developed symptoms five days later. They are doing well and recovering from home, according to the news release.

Six more fatalities in B.C., first inmate diagnosed with virus

Date reported: April 2

At least 31 people have died from COVID-19 in British Columbia, after health officials announced six more fatalities in the province. It’s the most deaths B.C. has reported in a 24-hour period throughout the outbreak.

Three of the deaths were reported in the Vancouver Coast Health region, which includes two at long-term care homes. One was reported in Fraser Health region, while the other two were in Vancouver Island, which is the first time a COVID-19 related death has taken place outside the Lower Mainland.

Fifty-five more people have also been diagnosed with COVID-19, including an inmate at Okanagan Correctional Centre, according to provincial health officer Dr. Bonnie Henry.

Among the province’s 1,121 total cases, 149 are in hospital, including 68 in intensive care, while 641 people have recovered from the virus.

Alberta reports two more deaths

Date reported: April 2

Two more people in Alberta have died after contracting COVID-19, while health officials also diagnosed 97 new cases in the past 24 hours.

The updates bring the province’s case count to 968, and its death toll to 13.

One of the recent fatalities involves a man in his 90s who was resident at Mackenzie Towne in Calgary, marking the fourth death at the long-term care home.

The second fatality involves a man in his 80s who was a resident of Manoir Du Lac care home in McLennan, which is about 440 northwest of Edmonton.

There are 74 cases of COVID-19 across nine different continuing care facilities in the province, according to Dr. Deena Hinshaw, Alberta’s chief medical officer of health. Of the province’s cases, officials believe that 108 of them are due to community transmission.

As of April 2, the province has administered 57,096 tests for COVID-19, while 174 people have since recovered from the virus.

Ontario brings Canada’s case count to over 10,000

Date reported: April 2

With health officials in Ontario reporting 401 new COVID-19 patients on Thursday morning, there are now more than 10,000 cases of the virus across Canada.

Along with the new cases, the Ministry of Health reported 16 deaths in Ontario since Wednesday. It brings the province’s case count to 2,793 and its death toll to 53.

There are now 831 people who have recovered from the virus, an increase of 142 resolved cases in a 24-hour span. Also among the province’s total number of cases are 405 people in hospital, including 167 in intensive care and 112 on ventilators to deal with the respiratory disease.

As of April 2, the province has administered 62,733 tests for COVID-19, while 2,052 people are still under investigation.

Information on the 16 new victims has yet to be released.

Following Wednesday morning’s Ministry of Health update, which presents the numbers that are current as of 4 p.m. the evening before, two more deaths were reported at the Pinecrest Nursing Home in Bobcaygeon, Ont., six more at Seven Oaks nursing home in Scarborough, and two more in the Lambton Public Health Unit.

Following Thursday’s Ministry of Health update, two additional deaths were reported at the Pinecrest Nursing Home, bringing the total to 17 at the long-term care home. Three additional deaths were reported in Durham Region, bringing their total to nine.

Brant County saw its first fatality in a woman in her 60s with pre-existing health issues. Wellington-Dufferin-Guelph Public Health unit also recorded its first death, involving an individual in their 80s.

Various news organizations have reported discrepancies in the Ministry of Health’s numbers compared to the tallies of individual public health units, saying there are in fact more deaths and cases in Ontario than what’s being reported.

Associate chief medical officer Dr. Barbara Yaffe said that their stats are “an under representation” of the most current numbers, but it’s on individual public health units to update their latest stats to the province’s data base, before updating their own websites.

According to the Toronto Star, which has tallied all 34 regional public health units’ statistics, there are 3,210 cases of COVID-19 and 92 deaths in Ontario as of Thursday at 5 p.m.

To provide transparency, Premier Doug Ford said he’ll release the modelling data for the province’s COVID-19 outbreak on Friday. The data will predict the progression of COVID-19 in Ontario, based on recent trends and other analysis.

“You deserve to know what I know. You deserve to see what I see when I am making decisions,” the premier said. “That will be a real wake up call.”

The decision by Ford comes after Prime Minister Justin Trudeau said on Friday morning that the federal government is still working to align its data with provincial and territorial governments before releasing modelling data to the public.

Saskatchewan surpasses 200 total cases

Date reported: April 2

Saskatchewan health officials have diagnosed 13 more people with COVID-19, increasing their case count to 206.

Among the patients, four are in hospital, including two in intensive care. Thirty-six people have now recovered from the virus, an increase of six in the past 24 hours.

Ninety-six of the cases involve recent travel, 10 have no known exposure, while 56 are still under investigation. There are also 44 people who are listed to have been infected by “community contacts.” A day earlier, health officials said 24 people are linked to a Christopher Lake snowmobile rally dinner held on March 14. An updated stat has not yet been provided.

As of April 2, the province has performed 11,395 tests for COVID-19.

Nova Scotia identifies 20 new cases

Date reported: April 2

Along with extending the province’s state of emergency for another two weeks, officials announced 20 more COVID-19 patients in Nova Scotia.

There are now 193 total cases in the province. Among the diagnoses, one is confirmed to be the result of community transmission, but there are others still under investigation.

Five people are in hospital, but 16 people have recovered from the virus.

As of April 2, health officials have also completed 7,446 negative tests for the virus, to go along with 193 confirmed cases.

New Brunswick diagnoses 10 more patients

Date reported: April 2

There are now 91 cases of COVID-19 in New Brunswick after health officials diagnosed 10 more patients on Thursday.

The new cases range in age from 20-79. Five are in Fredericton region, two in Edmundston, one in Saint John, and a first in the Miramichi region.

Of the total cases, 49 are linked to travel, 25 to close contacts who are also patients, three to community transmission, while 14 remain under investigation. Three people are also in hospital, including one in intensive care.

Twenty-two people have since recovered from the virus, while two people have been discharged from hospital, according to a press release by the province’s health officials.

Prince Edward Island reports a new case

Date reported: April 2

One more person has been diagnosed with COVID-19 in P.E.I., increasing its case count to 22.

The individual is a man in his 50s from the Queens County area who recently travelled internationally.

As of April 2, the province has administered almost 1,000 tests for COVID-19, according to a press release by health officials in P.E.I. Three people have since recovered from the virus.

Manitoba identifies 40 more cases

Date reported: April 2

Among Manitoba’s 40 new cases are three involving health care workers across two different facilities, Health Sciences Centre (HSC) in Winnipeg and Betel Home in Gimli.

Betel Home is also investigating a respiratory illness among nine residents, as they await results for their COVID-19 tests.

Among the province’s 167 total cases, five are in hospital, including four in intensive care. Eleven people have also recovered from the disease, according to the province's chief public health officer Dr. Brent Roussin.

Quebec reports 907 new cases, more fatalities

Date reported: April 2

Health officials in Quebec have diagnosed 907 new cases of COVID-19, bringing its total count to 5,518. There were also three more deaths in the province within the last 24 hours, increasing its death toll to 36.

Among the province’s total cases, 365 people are in hospital, including 96 in intensive care. More than 500 long-term care facilities in the province have also reported at least one case of COVID-19.

Montreal has identified 545 new patients in the past 24 hours, increasing its case count to 2,642. Eight more regions in the province have at least 100 cases.

As of April 2, Quebec health officials have seen 69,024 negative test results, while 4,871 people are under investigation for COVID-19.9.

Eight more cases in Newfoundland and Labrador

Date reported: April 2

There are now 183 cases of COVID-19 in Newfoundland and Labrador after health officials diagnosed eight more patients all located in the Eastern Health region.

Among the province’s total cases, 11 of them are in hospital, including four in intensive care. There are now 143 linked to Caul's Funeral Home in St. John's, where one patient attended a pair of funerals between March 15 and March 17.

As of April 2, the province has tested 2,929 people for the virus.

Yukon identifies its sixth case, resolves half of them

Date reported: April 1

Health officials reported a sixth case in Yukon, but also said that three of them have since recovered from COVID-19.

The latest case involves an individual who returned from Europe within the last couple weeks. They started to self-isolate in Whitehorse before showing symptoms, and are currently doing well, said Yukon’s chief medical officer Dr. Brendan Hanley.

As of April 1, the territory has administered 722 tests for the virus, while results are still pending for 26 people.

B.C. reports 53 more cases, one more death

Date reported: April 1

Twenty-five people have now died in British Columbia, as health officials announced one more fatality in Fraser Valley, to go along with 53 new COVID-19 cases.

The latest update brings the province’s case count to 1,066.

Among the patients, 142 are in hospital, including 67 in intensive care. There is also at least one case in 21 seniors’ care facilities across the province.

As of April 1, 606 patients have recovered from the virus, according to provincial health officer Dr. Bonnie Henry, while 44,639 people have been tested.

Alberta reports 117 new cases, two more deaths

Date reported: April 1

Officials in Alberta reported 117 new cases of COVID-19, to go along with two more deaths.

The rise in cases is because health officials went through a backlog yesterday of over 4,500 tests. About 98 per cent of them came negative, which is in line with their usual percentage, according to Alberta’s chief medical officer Dr. Deena Hinshaw.

The latest fatalities related to COVID-19 involve two men in their 80s, one in the North zone and the other in the Calgary zone. It brings the death toll to 11 in the province.

Hinshaw said of the province’s cases, 94 may be the result of community transmission. There are also 41 cases among four continuing care facilities in Alberta.

As of April 1, the province has been able to resolve 142 cases since the patients have recovered from the virus. Health officials have also completed 53,141 tests for COVID-19.

Ontario sees its highest surge in cases

Date reported: April 1

To go along with four more deaths, Ontario diagnosed 426 more people with COVID-19 on Wednesday, marking the highest increase in daily reported cases since the start of the outbreak.

There are now 2,392 cases of COVID-19 in the province, which includes 37 deaths, according to the Ministry of Health’s website. Among the patients, 332 are in hospital, including 145 in intensive care and 98 people who are ventilators.

There are also 689 people who have recovered from the virus, which is an increase of 258 resolved cases in a 24-hour period.

As of April 1, the province has tested 57,874 people for COVID-19, while there are 3,135 people still under investigation.

It’s unclear at this moment who are the four new fatalities.

Following the update by the Ministry of Health, the Canadian Press reported that there were two more deaths among patients at the Bobcaygeon, Ont. nursing home, where 12 residents and 1 volunteer have already passed away. The Haliburton, Kawartha, Pine Ridge District Health Unit is also reporting that 24 staff members have been infected.

Six new deaths were also reported at the Seven Oaks nursing home in Scarborough, bringing the total to eight. The nursing home has 23 confirmed cases, which includes six residents (and the eight deaths) to go along with nine staff members.

The Lambton Public Health Unit also reported two more deaths, bringing their total to six. Four of the deaths are affiliated with the Landmark Village, a seniors residence in Sarnia. Ont. One of the two most recent fatalities involves an individual in their 80s, while the second is in their 70s. They both tested positive for COVID-19 after passing away.

Various news organizations have reported discrepancies in the Ministry of Health’s numbers compared to the tallies of individual Public Health Units, saying that they are in fact more deaths and cases in Ontario than what’s being reported. Both the Toronto Star and CTV News reported that there are in fact 68 deaths across the province, when the Ministry of Health was only reporting 37 as of 10:30 on April 1.

Associate chief medical officer Dr. Barbara Yaffe said it might be because individual public health units haven’t updated their latest stats to the province’s data base, before updating their own websites.

“I realize they are very busy and there are a lot of things happening and putting data into a database doesn’t feel that important,” said Yaffe. “But it is important so we can be as up to date as possible and as transparent as possible – that’s what we all want.”

The Toronto Star has since reported that as of 5 p.m. on April 1, there are 2,806 confirmed or probable COVID-19 cases in Ontario, including 82 deaths across the 34 public health units in the province.

The CBC is also reporting that at least 40 deaths are among people at nursing and retirement homes in Ontario.

Third death in Saskatchewan

Date reported: April 1

A Saskatchewan resident in their 80s has passed away due to complications relating to COVID-19. It marks the third death in the province.

To go along with the news, health officials reported nine new cases in the province, bringing its total to 193.

Among the province’s total cases, eight are in hospital, including four in intensive care. Of the cases, 87 are linked to travel, 41 to close contacts, while eight have no known exposures, meaning they could be the result of community spread. Fifty-seven of the cases are still under investigation. Thirty people have also recovered, an increase of nine in the 24 hours.

As of April 1, there are 24 cases that can be traced back to a Christopher Lake snowmobile rally dinner held on March 14. The province has also completed 10,528 tests for COVID-19.

Second case in the Northwest Territories

Date reported: April 1

A second individual in the Northwest Territories has been diagnosed with COVID-19, according to health officials.

The patient is in self-isolation with mild symptoms in their home in Inuvik. They returned to the territory on March 21 after visiting British Columbia, and developed symptoms five days later.

As of April 1, 979 people for the virus in N.W.T., while two of them come back positive.

11 more cases in New Brunswick

Date reported: April 1

There are now 81 cases of COVID-19 in New Brunswick, after health officials diagnosed 11 new patients.

The new cases range in age from 20-60 years old. Two of them are in hospital, bringing the province’s total to four.

Of the 81 total cases, 43 are linked to travel as the reason for transmission, 22 to close-contact, and three due to community transmission. There are 13 cases that are still under investigation, while 14 people have recovered the virus.

Manitoba signs ‘early signs’ of community transmission

Date reported: April 1

To go along with reporting 24 new cases of COVID-19, health officials in Manitoba said they’re seeing “early signs” of community transmission.

Dr. Brent Roussin, the province’s chief public health officer, said there are several cases that can’t be linked to travel.

In total, Manitoba has 127 patients. Four people are in hospital, including three in intensive care, while four people have also recovered from COVID-19.

As of April 1, the province has administered 10,004 tests for the virus.

Nova Scotia identifies 26 new cases

Date reported: April 1

Health officials announced 26 more cases of COVID-19 in Nova Scotia, increasing its total to 173.

Among the new cases, one is a staff member at The Magnolia residential care home in Enfield, which now has three staff members and two residents who have tested positive. Two other nursing homes in Nova Scotia have also been infected, according to a press release.

Of the province’s 173 cases, one has been confirmed to be the result of community transmission, but health officials are expecting more as the outbreak continues. There are 11 people who have recovered from the virus, while the province has seen 6,591 negative tests for COVID-19 as of April 1.

Quebec reports two more deaths, 449 cases

Date reported: April 1

Premier Francois Legault announced two additional fatalities and 449 cases in Quebec, bringing the province’s totals to 33 and 4,611, respectively.

Among all the cases, 307 are in hospital, including 82 in intensive care.

Montreal continues to have the most cases among all regions in Quebec, with 2,097. The Montérégie region has at least 400, Laval and Estrie have at least 300, Quebec City, Mauricie-et-Centre-du-Québec, Lanaudière, Laurentides have at least 200, while there also are over 100 cases in Chaudière-Appalaches.

As of April, there have been 65,082 negative COVID-19 results in Quebec, while there are 5,770 people under investigation.

Newfoundland and Labrador reports 23 new cases

Date reported: April 1

There are now 175 cases of COVID-19 in Newfoundland and Labrador after health officials diagnosed 23 more patients.

All of the new cases are in the Eastern Health region.

Among the province’s total cases, 15 people are in hospital, including three in intensive care. One person has died, but there are now 10 people who have recovered.

As of April 1, the province has completed 2,816 tests for COVID-19.

Alberta reports latest death, 64 new cases

Date reported: March 31

Dr. Deena Hinshaw announced a third death at a Calgary long-term care home on Tuesday, the third in that facility and the province’s ninth.

There were 64 new cases in the province, bringing Alberta’s total to 754, including 120 patients who have recovered from the COVID-19 virus.

B.C. reports 43 new cases and five deaths

Date reported: March 31

Dr. Bonnie Henry announced British Columbia had diagnosed 43 more patients with COVID-19, pushing the province’s total to 1,013.

There were also five new deaths in B.C., pushing the province’s total to 24 and Canada’s total to 100.

Dr. Henry said 19 long-term and assisted-living facilities in the province were experiencing outbreaks.

Saskatchewan reports eight new COVID-19 cases

Date reported: March 31

As of Tuesday, there are 184 confirmed cases of COVID-19 in Saskatchewan. There are reported cases in the Far North, North, Central, Saskatoon, South and Regina regions, with 90 of the cases in Saskatoon. 83 of the cases are people ages 20 to 44, 64 are aged 45 to 64, 31 are 65 years or older, and six are 19 years old or younger.

Manitoba identifies seven new cases

Date reported: March 31

The provincial tally of COVID-19 cases has risen to 103 with seven more announced Tuesday. The total cases include a health worker at Selkirk Regional Health Centre, where the individual worked in the facility’s emergency department and medical ward from March 19 to 23. Public health is following up with anyone who may have come in contact with the individual.

New public health orders will take effect in the province starting April 1, which include restricting the operation of non-critical businesses. You can read about what is affected on the Manitoba government’s website.

New Brunswick adds two more cases to tally

Date reported: March 31

A total of 70 people in New Brunswick have been diagnosed with COVID-19 after two more individuals were identified on Tuesday.

One of the cases is related to travel, while the other is tied to association with another COVID-19 patient. The individuals are in their 20s and 60s, and in the Fredericton and Edmunston regions.

Chief medical officer of health Dr. Jennifer Russell says that just because there have been some low-number days this week, it doesn’t mean residents should be less vigilant.

“Just because we have had a couple days of low new-case numbers, now is not the time to be complacent,” said Russell. “We will have good days and bad days, but we cannot lose focus.”

Quebec reports six more deaths

Date reported: March 31

On Tuesday, the province announced six more people who had COVID-19 had died. The total number of cases in the province also rose to 4,162.

The increase represents a 21 per cent increase in 24 hours, which is in line with what public health officials had been expecting, given the recent trajectory of cases.

Nearly half of the cases (1,991) are reported to be in the Montreal public health region. Cases have been reported in all regions of the province.

There are 5,601 cases still under investigation for COVID-19, and a total of 63,378 who have tested negative for the virus.

Prince Edward Island identifies more travel-related cases

Date reported: March 31

Three new COVID-19 cases were identified by the province on Tuesday. During a press conference, chief public health officer Dr. Heather Morrison said all three cases were related to international travel, and all three are self-isolating at home. She said that one case is a man in his 20s, while the other two are women, one in her 30s and the other in her 40s.

On the province’s hotline, 60 complaints were made Monday about people who were not staying at home.

Newfoundland and Labrador ties multiple cases to funeral

Date reported: March 31

A funeral that took place between March 15 and 17 in St. John’s is tied to 120 of Newfoundland and Labrador’s 152 confirmed COVID-19 cases. The province’s one death related to COVID-19 is also tied to Caul’s Funeral Home. According to medical officials no one knowingly violated a quarantine order, and they are urging the public not to point fingers at any individual.

"Nobody went out and intentionally spread this," Dr. Janice Fitzgerald, Newfoundland and Labrador’s chief medical officer of health, said Sunday. "This happened at a time when we didn't have the same measures in place that we do now.”

Nova Scotia identifies 20 new cases

Date reported: March 31

The province announced on Tuesday that 20 more people had been diagnosed with COVID-19, bringing the provincial total to 147. Nova Scotia reported Monday that one of those cases is a confirmed community transmission. It also confirmed that four of the patients are public health employees.

Nova Scotia is also closely watching cases in long-term care homes. Currently there are four staff and two residents of long-term care facilities who are positive for COVID-19.

Affected individuals include four who are currently in hospital. Across all cases ages range from under 10 to over 80.

Ontario cases just shy of 2,000

Date reported: March 31

Ontario saw 260 new COVID-19 cases identified over the last 24 hours, a 15.2 per cent jump from Monday’s total. The province now has 1,966 cases and 33 deaths related to COVID-19.

Of the COVID-19 patients in Ontario, 49.8 per cent of them are male, 49.5 per cent are female, and 12 cases are not known; 1,496 cases are between the ages of 20 and 64, while 46 are under 20 and 421 are over 64. The Greater Toronto Area public health unit accounts for 59.1 per cent of cases. While transmission is unknown for 47.3 per cent of cases, it has been confirmed that 25.7 per cent of patients travelled in the 14 days prior to becoming ill, 10.2 per cent of patients had close contact with a known COVID-19 case, and 16.8 per cent had neither.

Early Tuesday morning, a Bobcaygeon, Ont. nursing home confirmed that three more of its residents had died. In total, 12 residents and one volunteer at Pinecrest Nursing Home have died with links to COVID-19. At least three other residents and 24 staff members (about a third of the home’s staff) have tested positive for COVID-19. Since the Pinecrest Nursing Home information came in after the 4:00 p.m. reporting deadline Ontario follows, the most recent cases and deaths from the nursing home are not yet included in the provincial statistics.

Yukon announces one more case

Date reported: March 30

Yukon said it confirmed its fifth case in the territory on Monday. Chief medical officer Dr. Brendan Hanley said the case could be part of a “cluster investigation” from which “one or two” other cases could be expected. In total, 688 people in Yukon have been tested; 90 tests are still pending.

Alberta reports five more deaths

Date reported: March 30

Alberta’s chief medical officer Dr. Deena Hinshaw called Monday “one of the hardest days yet” as she announced five patients died of COVID-19 complications, bringing the province’s total to eight. One of the victims was a man in his 30s. The other four were two women in their 50s and 70s and two men in their 80s.

There were 29 new cases in Alberta, bringing the total number to 690.

Ontario sees biggest single-day jump in cases

Date reported: March 30

Reporting for a second time on Monday, Ontario announced a total of 1,715 cases in the province, and a total of 33 deaths. Ten more people were reported to have died related to COVID-19.

While Ontario’s official tally remains at 23 deaths, associate chief medical officer Dr. Barbara Yaffe said during an afternoon conference that 10 more deaths have been reported since the morning update. It is unknown what the specifics are of the cases, but Dr. Yaffe confirmed the deaths were in Haliburton, Lambton, Haldimand Norfolk and Huron Perth public health regions.

At a press conference on Monday, Premier Doug Ford advised that all people over the age of 70 should stay at home and self-isolate.

“We need to protect them,” Ford said.

Of Ontario’s confirmed cases, 26.3 per cent had travelled within 14 days of falling ill, 9.6 per cent had close contact with someone confirmed to have COVID-19, 16.2 per cent had neither, and the remaining 47.9 per cent were still pending exposure information.

B.C. identifies 86 new cases over the weekend

Date reported: March 30

From Saturday afternoon to Monday, 86 new cases were identified in British Columbia, according to provincial health officer Dr. Bonnie Henry.

This brings the province’s total to 970. B.C. confirmed two more deaths, bringing the province’s total to 19.

Coroners also

Saskatchewan reports first COVID-19-related deaths

Date reported: March 30

Two people (not in the same location, but both in hospital) are reported to have died, Saskatchewan reported on Monday. Both patients were in their 70s. This marks the first and second COVID-19-related deaths the province has seen since the beginning of the pandemic. The province also reported that 20 more people had tested positive.

Manitoba nears 100 cases

Date reported: March 30

Twenty-four additional cases of COVID-19 have been identified in Manitoba, bringing the total number of cases to 96 for the province.

Four people are currently hospitalized due to COVID-19 in Manitoba, and one of those individuals is currently in intensive care. Investigations are currently underway to determine how it was transmitted.

Manitoba has performed 8,550 tests so far, including 1,430 over the weekend.

Quebec cases climb past 3,000

Date reported: March 30

Twenty-five people have died due to COVID-19 in Quebec, Premier François Legault said in his daily briefing on Monday. The province also reported an increase in the number of cases, with Quebec’s total now reaching 3,430. Among them, 235 people are hospitalized and 78 of them are in intensive care.

In the premier’s briefing, he also outlined additional measures the province would be taking to support Quebecers in the fight against COVID-19: all retailers will now be closed on Sundays and $133 million in aid would be made available for seniors’ residences and other facilities supporting vulnerable populations.

Nova Scotia identifies five more cases

Date reported: March 30

Five more people have been identified as having COVID-19, bringing the province’s total number of cases to 127. The province also said on Monday that it had determined at least one of the cases was from community spread and not related to travel.

Of the 127 total cases, patients range in age from under 10 to mid-70s. Four individuals are in hospital.

Seven new cases in Prince Edward Island

Date reported: March 30

A total of 18 people have been diagnosed with COVID-19 in P.E.I., as seven new cases were announced on Monday. The new cases are between the ages of 20 and 80, and include four women and three men.

P.E.I. opened a phone line earlier this month for residents to report people who were not adhering to social distancing procedures. Since it opened, the line has received about 2,000 calls, averaging 900 per week. Over the weekend, the province followed up on 56 complaints, issued 12 verbal warnings and nine written warnings.

Newfoundland reports its first death

Date reported: March 30

The province reported its first death attributed to the COVID-19 virus on Monday, along with 13 new positive cases, bringing the provincial total cases to 148. All new cases reported were in the Eastern Health region for the province.

The deceased was a retired man in the Eastern Health region. He passed away on Sunday, reportedly deteriorating quickly after being hospitalized about three days earlier.

According to the CBC, Newfoundland has the second-highest rate of infection per-capita in the country.

Second surge in as many days in Ontario

Date reported: March 30

Ontario saw the highest single-day increase for a second day in a row, this time with 351 new cases of COVID-19 on Monday. No new deaths were reported.

The increase comes after Ontario Premier Doug Ford invoked the Emergency Management and Civil Protection Act to prevent gatherings of more than five people in the province over the weekend. Exceptions exist for families of more than five people, and child-care centres supporting frontline health care workers.

For a timeline of cases from Jan. 25 - March 29, please check our full-roundup here.