NFL player labels league’s George Floyd statement as ‘complete trash’

Jack Rathborn
Roger Goodell has come under criticism from NFL players: Getty

Jacksonville Jaguars safety Peyton Thompson has labelled the NFL’s statement on the death of George Floyd as “complete trash” while revealing he was told by his coaches not to kneel in protest during the national anthem in 2016.

The NFL responded to the death of Floyd at the hands of white police officer Derek Chauvin, who knelt on his neck for nine minutes, by insisting the league was “saddened” by the tragic events across the United States.

The league also vowed to continue working to “address systematic issues” but has now come under fire from some of its own players, who insist there is a level of hypocrisy due to the treatment of Colin Kaepernick.

The former San Francisco 49ers quarterback has been exiled from the league since 2016 after protesting against racial injustice, with Thomspon now speaking out about his own experience at the time.

He wrote: “The statement issued by the NFL is complete trash. I specifically remember [Jaguars executive vice-president] Tom Coughlin and [head coach] Doug Marone telling us we couldn’t kneel.

Peyton Thompson has called the NFL statement trash (Getty)

“Thank God we had an owner of minority [Shahid Khan] who weighed in and got us to kneel together! My job security was on the line if I supported my people.”

Houston Texans wide receiver Kenny Stills also replied to the statement, writing: “Save the bulls***”.

While Eric Reid, who knelt alongside Kaepernick during their time together in San Francisco, added: “I’m looking forward to ‘Songs of the Season 2.0.”

Niners owner Jed York confirmed the organisation would be donating $1 million to “local and national organizations who are creating change”, but Reid insists his employer is missing the point.

“Nobody wants your money Jed,” Reid responded. “We want justice. We’ve always wanted justice. Y’all are truly diluted.”

While this year’s No1 overall pick in the NFL draft, Joe Burrow, is now among a number of white athletes speaking out and insisting the “black community needs our help”.

“They have been unheard for far too long,” the Cincinnati Bengals star said.

“Open your ears, listen, and speak. This isn’t politics. This is human rights.”

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    Hong Kong’s constitutional affairs minister has warned opposition parties their primary election this weekend could break the new national security law, as well as the city’s election laws.But Secretary for Constitutional and Mainland Affairs Erick Tsang Kwok-wai’s warning was dismissed by Benny Tai Yiu-ting, a key organiser of the primary.Optimistic after a landslide victory in last November’s district council elections, the opposition said it planned to begin its new primary process this weekend as it narrowed down its field of candidates ahead of September’s vote.Get the latest insights and analysis from our Global Impact newsletter on the big stories originating in China.About 250 booths would be set up on roadsides, at district councillors’ offices, and at so-called yellow shops, those publicly identifying with the protest movement, across the city’s five geographical constituencies.In an interview published by several pro-Beijing newspapers on Thursday, Tsang said some residents had complained to electoral authorities and the privacy commissioner’s office about the legality of the primary.He said the complainants were concerned whether organisers of the primary were trying to rig or undermine the Legislative Council elections in September.Complainants also said candidates in the primary have vowed to vote down the government’s budget and paralyse the city’s administration, if their camp managed to win a historic majority.“Under Article 22 of the law, it is wrong to seriously interfere, disrupt or undermine the performance of duties and functions by the central or local governments,” Tsang said. “But whether it would constitute a crime would depend on many factors, such as the evidence gathered and actual situation.”Hong Kong national security law official English version:Without elaborating, the minister also said the primary could break articles 20 and 29 of the new law, which prohibit acts of secession and collusion with external forces to endanger national security.Tsang said under the Elections (Corrupt and Illegal Conduct) Ordinance, everyone who has declared his intention to run for the Legislative Council would be considered a candidate, and have to abide by the election expenses limit of their respective constituencies – which ranged from HK$2 million to HK$3.3 million per candidate.Writing on his Facebook page on Thursday, Tai said the primary was not meant to undermine the September elections.“It was only for residents to express which teams they would support in representing the camp to take part in the official polls,” he wrote. “No one could manipulate so many people in making the decision.” Blue turns yellow? What Hongkongers said with their district council voteTai added that Article 22 of the law stated that someone would be guilty of subversion if he organised or took part in acts involving force or unlawful means.“Candidates in the primary were only agreeing that if they … use lawmakers’ powers to vote down the budget, the city’s government would be held accountable to the legislature. That cannot be unlawful,” he said.Tai also said the primary would not involve any call for Hong Kong to be separated from China, so it could not break the secession clause under Article 20.“The money to be used in the primary was gathered from local crowdfunding, not from external organisations,” he added.Meanwhile, the Hong Kong Research Association, a pro-Beijing group, said they interviewed about 1,100 residents from July 2 to July 5, and found 66 per cent of respondents were supportive or very supportive of the national security law.That was 9 percentage points higher than the association’s previous opinion poll last month.Rebel City: Hong Kong’s Year of Water and Fire is a new book of essays that chronicles the political confrontation that has gripped the city since June 2019. Edited by the South China Morning Post's Zuraidah Ibrahim and Jeffie Lam, the book draws on work from the Post's newsrooms across Hong Kong, Beijing, Washington and Singapore, with unmatched insights into all sides of the conflict. Buy directly from SCMP today and get a 15% discount (regular price HKD$198). It is available at major bookshops worldwide or online through Amazon, Kobo, Google Books, and eBooks.com.More from South China Morning Post: * Hong Kong civil servants employed from July 1 to be required in writing to swear allegiance, uphold Basic Law * Hong Kong activist Joshua Wong in High Court bid over district council election banThis article Hong Kong opposition parties warned weekend primary could break national security and election laws first appeared on South China Morning PostFor the latest news from the South China Morning Post download our mobile app. Copyright 2020.

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    South China Morning Post

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The final list should be of issues that cannot be resolved.“Then we should properly manage those disputes and minimise the damage to relations between the two nations based on the spirit of seeking common ground while reserving differences,” he said.The two sides should also cooperate on pandemic control, Wang said, adding that China was willing to share its Covid-19 experience and vaccine development with the US.The US has accused China of covering up the initial outbreak of the coronavirus that caused the Covid-19 disease, allowing it to spread to other nations, and US President Donald Trump referred to it as the “Chinese virus”.In a tweet on Monday, Trump said China had caused great damage to the US and the world.Military confrontation is also on the rise. The US has sent two aircraft carriers, USS Ronald Reagan and USS Nimitz, to disputed waters in the South China Sea for military exercises starting on Saturday – overlapping with drills China was holding in the region.Chinese President Xi Jinping said in his latest telephone call with Trump in March that cooperation was the only choice for the two nations.But tensions have continued to surface in multiple areas. The US has threatened to impose sanctions on Chinese officials for infringing on Hong Kong’s freedoms and over alleged human rights abuses in Xinjiang, and has imposed restrictions on Chinese state media operating in the US. Beijing has vowed to retaliate. Some diplomats and pundits have said Beijing must brace for a full-blown escalation of tensions and prepare to gradually decouple from the US.Wang said relations would not return to how they had been previously, but that did not mean the two should “forcefully decouple themselves”.He added that the US should not attempt to “chase and intercept China in a frantic manner all over the world”, yet expect China to support the US in bilateral and global affairs.Additional reporting by Laura ZhouPurchase the 100+ page China Internet Report 2020 Pro Edition, brought to you by SCMP Research, and enjoy a 30% discount (original price US$400). The report includes deep-dive analysis, trends, and case studies on the 10 most important internet sectors. Now in its 3rd year, this go-to source for understanding China tech also comes with exclusive access to 6 webinars with C-level executives. Offer valid until 31 August 2020. To purchase, please click here.More from South China Morning Post: * Korean war lessons: China and US can be friends ‘if China is a rival they cannot beat’ * China says ‘some countries’ are trying to block its development by ‘interfering’ in Hong Kong * US-China talks: Mike Pompeo’s seven-hour meeting with Yang Jiechi ‘helps atmosphere’ – but statements reveal divisions * Beijing’s ‘Tiger’ diplomat takes decades of China-US negotiation into crucial meeting with Mike Pompeo * ‘Political virus’ is spreading in US along with Covid-19, says Chinese Foreign Minister Wang YiThis article US, China should reconcile and make 3 lists, says Foreign Minister Wang Yi first appeared on South China Morning PostFor the latest news from the South China Morning Post download our mobile app. Copyright 2020.