PAP elects new Central Executive Committee

Party cadres from ruling party People’s Action Party (PAP) selected the members for its Central Executive Committee (CEC) on Sunday.

The twelve who were elected included Prime Minister Lee Hsien Loong, Minister for Home Affairs Teo Chee Hean, Finance Minister Tharman Shanmugaratnam, Minister for National Development Khaw Boon Wan, Foreign Affairs and Law Minister K Shanmugan, Health Minister Gan Kim Yong, Defence Minister Ng Eng Hen, Minister for Communications and Information Yaacob Ibrahim, Labour Chief Lim Swee Say and Senior Minister of State Grace Fu.
 
Also inducted to the CEC were Senior Minister of State for Defence Chan Chun Sing and Minister for Education Heng Swee Keat. Acting Manpower Minister Tan Chuan Jin and Environment Minister Vivian Balakrishnan were co-opted into the committee.

Already CEC members before this election, Chan, Heng, and Tan had been appointed to the CEC in November 2011 to replace three of the six positions left empty after the General Elections.

Not re-elected into the CEC was MP for Moulmein-Kallang GRC Denise Phua, who was known for her dissenting voice, as well as MP for Marine Parade GRC Seah Kian Peng.

The newly-elected CEC is widely regarded by political watchers to be an indication of Singapore’s fourth generation of leadership, and all eyes have been on how the PAP would transform itself after its record-low performance in the last General Election.

Held once every two years, the CEC is PAP’s highest policy-making body, and its choice of members set the tone for the Party’s approach to governance for the next four years.

Assistant Professor of Law at the Singapore Management University Eugene Tan felt that while the CEC seems to be taking party renewal seriously, member diversity is lacking.

“The election of Education Minister Heng Swee Keat and Minister Chan Chun Sing indicates that the PAP is actively renewing its leadership,” said Tan.

“The fact that the PAP CEC now predominantly comprises of people in their 40s and early 50s suggests that the party is adapting to changing demographics and recognises that the party needs to reach out to younger voters.”

However, he added that the party could have been more diverse in its selection.

“With only one woman CEC Member (Grace Fu) and given that almost half the electorate are women – is one area they should look into. Most of the CEC party cadres are also political office holders and the committee seems to lack party cadres who are also fairly critical of government policies, who challenge mainstream positions.”

Related links:

 PAP 'must return to its roots'
Catherine Lim: PAP incapable of reinventing itself
Singapore ruling party rebuffed in by-election

  • How a mom stole a car in under 60 seconds 13 hours ago
    How a mom stole a car in under 60 seconds

    “I didn't steal your car but I think my mom may have. It's a long story. I'll explain, but your car is safe and sound," read the flier posted in Red Hook, Brooklyn. It’s a strange tale that began when Cheyrl Thorpe was asked by her daughter Nekisia Davis to dog sit her Pomeranian at her apartment, according to New York Magazine.

  • All-new 2015 Subaru Outback reestablishes higher ground 16 hours ago
    All-new 2015 Subaru Outback reestablishes higher ground

    Much of Subaru’s modern day success in America can be attributed to one car: the Outback. Born in 1994 as a response to the growing popularity of SUVs, the Outback established a winning formula of combining a high-riding suspension, butch body cladding and big round fog lights to its comfortable, no-nonsense Legacy wagon. It is the kind of unique product that only a quirky company like Subaru could build, and was one that kept Subaru from slipping into ubiquity even as traditional SUVs and crossovers have taken over the world.

  • Custom faux-tique electric tram aims to replace New York's horses over the neigh-sayers 16 hours ago
    Custom faux-tique electric tram aims to replace New York's horses over the neigh-sayers

    For the record, it's the year 2014. I mention that in case someone reading this story about a push to replace horses with motorized carriages thinks they've stumbled onto some archival piece by accident. It's been more than 100 years since the first vehicles began to trundle around Manhattan, but the last remaining vestiges of horse-powered transport in the city could be nigh — if the backers of a massive electric wagon get their way.

  • Singaporeans slam NEA's $120 licence requirement for tissue sellers
    Singaporeans slam NEA's $120 licence requirement for tissue sellers

    Singaporeans on social media reacted angrily to news that tissue sellers at hawker centres and street corners are being required to pay for an annual licence.

  • Heartbreaking texts from students on sinking S. Korea ferry
    Heartbreaking texts from students on sinking S. Korea ferry

    Heart-wrenching messages of fear, love and despair, sent by high school students from a sinking South Korean ferry, added extra emotional weight Thursday to a tragedy that has stunned the nation. Nearly 300 people -- most of them students on a high school trip to a holiday island -- are still missing after the ferry capsized and sank on Wednesday morning. Mom, I love you," student Shin Young-Jin said in a text to his mother that was widely circulated in the South Korean media.

  • ‘Huge’ Hindu, Buddhist statues against Islam, ex-judge says
    ‘Huge’ Hindu, Buddhist statues against Islam, ex-judge says

    KUALA LUMPUR, April 16 — The “huge” statues at a Hindu temple in Batu Caves and Buddhist temple in Penang are an affront to Islam as the religion forbids idolatry, a retired Court of Appeals judge...