SAF captain Tan Baoshu who was discharged over NSF’s death has died

Wan Ting Koh
Reporter
Obituary of Captain Tan Baoshu. (PHOTO: The Beautiful Memories website)

SINGAPORE — Tan Baoshu, the Singapore Armed Forces (SAF) captain (CPT) who was given a discharge not amounting to an acquittal (DNATA) over the death of a full-time national serviceman, died on Thursday morning (13 February).

Following his diagnosis of stage 4 cancer, the Attorney-General’s Chambers (AGC) had applied for a DNATA for CPT Tan, 31. The court granted the application on 8 January.

Tan is scheduled to be cremated on Monday at Mandai Crematorium. 

CPT Tan was charged on 31 October 2018 with committing a rash act causing the death of Corporal First Class (CFC) Dave Lee, who collapsed after a fast march on 18 April 2018. He was the Officer Commanding of the Support Company of 1st Battalion Singapore Guards, the unit where CFC Lee was serving his NS duties. 

The officer had originally claimed trial to the charge.

CFC Lee, 19, had completed an 8km fast march in Bedok Camp on 18 April 2018 before he showed signs of heat injury and had to be hospitalised. He died two weeks after being admitted to Changi General Hospital. 

CPT Tan was the supervising officer for the fast march, which happened between 6.30am and 8.25am. He was accused of failing to evacuate CFC Lee in a timely manner and for not allowing necessary treatment to be administered to him from 8.25am to 9.10am.

A woman who identified herself to Yahoo News Singapore as CPT Tan’s sister at the officer’s wake in Clementi West asked for privacy and said that the family has no statement to make.

Jasmine Yeo, the mother of CFC Lee, told Yahoo News Singapore on Thursday afternoon that she had heard about CPT Tan’s death. Yeo, 48, said, "Give our families time to settle down" and declined to comment further.

  • additional reporting by Nicholas Yong

Related stories

SAF captain given discharge not amounting to acquittal over NSF's death due to officer's terminal cancer

SAF captain charged over death of NSF Dave Lee