SHOW BITS: Still more rules at the Grammys

LOS ANGELES (AP) — Show Bits brings you the 55th annual Grammy Awards through the eyes of Associated Press journalists. Follow them on Twitter where available with the handles listed after each item.

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GRAMMYS DON'T WAIT FOR ANYONE

The Grammy Awards show started at 8 p.m. EST. Not at 8:05 or 8:07 or 8:10

The late-arriving celebrity crowd quickly learned that fact when they were kept in a vestibule with all the regular folks until the first commercial break. Only then were they allowed to take their seats.

That meant Drake, Jenna Jameson and Tito Ortiz had to cool their heels while Taylor Swift opened the show with her exuberant performance of "We Are Never Ever Getting Back Together."

The waiting continued as host LL Cool J greeted the audience and on through Ed Sheeran and Elton John's performance.

The stars' handlers did manage to move them to the front of the line that was waiting to get in.

— Nekesa Mumbi Moody — Twitter: https://www.twitter.com/nekesamumbi .

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TAYLOR SETS TWEETERS ATWITTER

Did Taylor Swift just launch World War III?

After Swift broke into a faux British accent during her Grammy-opening performance, several One Direction fans took to Twitter to voice their disdain at the apparent dig at one of the singer's former flames, One Direction member (and native Brit) Harry Styles.

The English-accented flourish came when Swift started speaking in the middle of an "Alice in Wonderland"-like performance of her Grammy-nominated song "We Are Never Ever Getting Back Together."

Reaction was swift.

"Did Taylor Swift just do an English accent?" director Judd Apatow tweeted immediately after it happened.

— Derrik J. Lang — Twitter: https://twitter.com/derrikjlang

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QUICKQUOTE: BONNIE RAITT

"I was up against all these guys who had much bigger records and a bigger splash. It makes an old girl feel good." — 63-year-old singer-songwriter Bonnie Raitt, who earned her 10th career Grammy in the best Americana album category for "Slipstream," beating out a field that included Mumford & Sons, The Lumineers and The Avett Brothers.

— Beth Harris — Twitter https://twitter.com/bethharrisap

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QUICKQUOTE: TAYLOR SWIFT

"So he calls me up and he's like, 'I still love you.' And I'm like, 'I'm sorry, I'm busy opening up the Grammys.'" — Taylor Swift, during her show-opening performance of her Grammy-nominated song "We Are Never Ever Getting Back Together."

— Anthony McCartney — https://twitter.com/mccartneyAP

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KIMBRA WAS THE CHARM

After Gotye's "Somebody That I Used to Know" won the Grammy for best pop duo/group performance, he revealed that Kimbra wasn't his first, or even his second, choice for the song.

He had already gone through two female singers for the track and was waiting on another vocalist when "she called out."

"I built so much expectation with that vocalist that I was feeling a little crushed," he said backstage after collecting the Grammy.

It came down to Kimbra to sing on the song that was recorded in her apartment. It was last year's biggest hit.

As for the unnamed singer, Gotye said she makes wonderful music on her own and "shouldn't be mad."

Gotye also won the Grammy for best alternative music album for "Making Mirrors."

— Mesfin Fekadu — Twitter https://twitter.com/MusicMesfin

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QUICKQUOTE: FRANK OCEAN

"I have to perform tonight so the wheels are constantly spinning. You can't really just sit in your seat and take it all in." Frank Ocean on his expectations for the Grammy Awards.

— Beth Harris — Twitter https://twitter.com/bethharrisap

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QUICKQUOTE: FLORENCE WELCH

"I have to keep brushing mine down." — Florence Welch on the green sequins on her Grammy Awards dress.

— Anthony McCartney — https://twitter.com/mccartneyAP

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DRESSING ROOM MATES

Kelly Clarkson is in good company backstage at the Grammys.

The original "American Idol" champion, who's performing at Sunday's ceremony, posted a photo to Instagram of her dressing room door, which featured the names of her roommates: Alicia Keys and Miranda Lambert.

"Our dressing room rules!" wrote the "Stronger" singer.

Clarkson later uploaded photos of her glam squad curling her hair, as well as a close-up of her glittery custom nail polish.

"Should we call it 'Stronger'?" she asked.

— Derrik J. Lang — Twitter: https://twitter.com/derrikjlang

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QUICKQUOTE: FRANK OCEAN

"It would mean my name changes in the press forever." — Frank Ocean, speaking on the red carpet about what winning a Grammy would mean to him.

— Nekesa Mumbi Moody — http://www.twitter.com

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QUICKQUOTE: JOHN PAUL WHITE

"I think it's appropriate that Taylor thanks us. We've been carrying her for a while and it's getting a little tiring," John Paul White of the Civil Wars, who won a Grammy for the song "Safe & Sound" from "The Hunger Games," which he co-wrote with Taylor Swift.

— Sandy Cohen — Twitter http://www twitter.com/apsandy

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ESPERANZA SPALDING LEARNED LESSON WELL

Last year's best new artist, Esperanza Spalding, is back winning Grammys again this year — with a little help from the music teacher who began training her when she was 8.

The jazz star and her teacher, Thara Memory, claimed the award for best instrumental arrangements accompanying vocalist(s) for "City of Roses" at Sunday's Grammy pre-telecast.

Spalding escorted Memory to the stage to accept the award and was moved when speaking about their student-teacher relationship. She also noted the "City of Roses" composition features some of Memory's 16-year-old students.

Spalding also won a Grammy Sunday for best jazz vocal album for "Radio Music Society."

— Mesfin Fekadu — Twitter https://twitter.com/MusicMesfin

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EDITOR'S NOTE: Show Bits brings you the 55th annual Grammy Awards in Los Angeles through the eyes of Associated Press journalists. Follow them on Twitter where available with the handles listed after each item.

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