Survey: 'Bad' Work Habits of Singapore Bosses

Survey: 'Bad' Work Habits of Singapore Bosses

Ever wondered why your boss keeps asking you to do OT? Apparently 75 per cent of employers in Singapore think it's important you do just that or work over the weekends. By: Alythea Ho Unless you've spent your entire career under a blessed star (or rock), chances are you've encountered bosses with 'bad' work habits. Like the manager who kept calling you for trivial reasons when you were relaxing at a beach in Phuket, or that superior who insisted you work overtime to complete a task. According to two surveys by the JobsCentral Group, 75 per cent of Singapore employers believe it's important their staff work over the weekends or after office hours. In addition, nearly half (46 per cent) say they would contact employees on leave.

"Being in a highly-connected world today means respect for an employee's personal time can be diminished due to the ease of communication," says Michelle Lim, Chief Operating Officer of JobsCentral Group. "Expecting employees to work beyond normal working hours has become the norm, possibly from cultural issues like equating extra effort to good performance, or economic reasons like trying to improve productivity." Other 'bad' boss habits include: • Stretching meetings beyond office hours - 23 per cent • Emailing employees at wee hours of the morning - 20 per cent • Frequently shortening project deadlines - 17 per cent • Asking employees to run personal errands - 6 per cent A total of 256 employers and 3,299 employees from all occupational levels and industries participated in the surveys which ran from August to October 2012. Bad blood with your boss could significantly affect work happiness Nearly two-thirds of Singapore workers (61 per cent) who aren't happy with their bosses also feel miserable in their jobs. The survey also shows that workers unhappy with their bosses are more likely to complain about a lack of autonomy and opportunities for advancement. "Managers can make your job satisfying and rewarding, or a living hell. Lack of advancement opportunities is the top grouse of workers and employers would do well to address this issue," says Lim. On the positive side, most Singapore workers claim they are satisfied working for their bosses (69 per cent). These workers are happier, with only 28 per cent of this group reporting job dissatisfaction. Lim explains, "Most people want to grow in their careers, and having clear KPIs and career roadmaps would go a long way toward managing their work happiness. A happy worker ultimately benefits the employer as he or she is more efficient and loyal." Male bosses preferred over female bosses While the majority (59 per cent) said they didn't have a preference for male or female bosses, those who did showed a significant preference for male bosses. 33 per cent of respondents say they would be happier working for a male boss. On the other hand, just 8 per cent said they preferred a female superior. Finances and Fear keep employees from leaving Finally, regardless of their relationships with superiors, employees list financial commitments (29 per cent) and fears of not being able to find a better job (25 per cent) as the top reasons keeping them from leaving a job, even if they are unhappy with it. Interestingly enough, the findings seem to suggest that this fear of not finding a better job is more significant than a self-perceived lack of skill-sets to switch jobs. Just 11 per cent of respondents cited the latter as an important deciding factor for not leaving their jobs. For the full report, head here. Does your boss have any 'bad' work habits? Share with us in the comment box below!
The JobsCentral Group, a CareerBuilder company, is the owner of JobsCentral.com.sg, one of Singapore's largest job and learning portals. Get a free career personality test and more career- and education-related articles at JobsCentral and JobsCentral Community. Alternatively, Like us on Facebook or Follow us on Twitter for more career-centric content!

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