30% drop in accidents since e-scooter footpath ban imposed: Lam Pin Min

A telephone poll conducted by the Reach government feedback portal also found two-thirds of respondents agreeing that footpath safety has improved since the footpath ban was implemented. (PHOTO: Dhany Osman / Yahoo News Singapore)

SINGAPORE — The number of accidents involving e-scooters on public paths has dropped “about 30 per cent” since the devices were banned from such footpaths on 5 November last year.

This figure was shared by Senior Minister of State for Transport Lam Pin Min in Parliament on Monday (6 January) as he answered questions from several Members of Parliament (MPs) on the issue.

“The decision to ban e-scooters on footpaths is to restore footpath safety.... As we step up enforcement, we can expect further reduction in such accidents,” he added.

Dr Lam said a telephone poll conducted by the Reach government feedback portal found two-thirds of respondents agreeing that footpath safety has improved since the ban was implemented.

Between 5 November and 31 December last year – during which the Land Transport Authority (LTA) allowed for an “advisory period” – 6,000 advisories were issued to remind e-scooter riders about the new regulations and over 300 summonses were issues against reckless riders.

Strict enforcement since 1 Jan

Since 1 January, the LTA has imposed strict enforcement of the ban with those caught liable to face fines of up to $2,000 along with possible jail terms of up to three months.

“So far 27 errant riders have been caught,” said Dr Lam.

He also noted that the LTA has expanded its team of active mobility officers, which includes auxiliary police officers, from 100 to 182 members. “Recruitment efforts are underway and LTA targets to enlarge the team to 200 soon,” he added.

Dr Lam said that the LTA has also trialled the use of roving CCTVs to “complement existing enforcement efforts”.

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